Recent Articles

Headlines

5 years ago

Cheat: How to get the awesome Skyfire Browser today...

14

For those who've been following the whole Skyfire browser trend, you'll know that to get the app you have to enroll in their beta testing.

What's worse is that beta testing is closed (invite only) and if you sign up now, there's very little chance of getting in on the glory.

Well, thanks to this little tip, you can bump your application up and get the download link now:

  • If you have never registered, just go here and enter in CNET100 in the code section
  • If you have previously registered, but did not get enrolled, go back and re-enter your info exactly (same number, same email, same name) and now enter the code: CNET100

You should see a screen that says that they've found your registration and you'll get an SMS link to download the Skyfire browser.

No telling how long this will last, so jump on it now! (Only U.S. based customers though, sorry)

Thanks rex (via our fourms, via ppcgeeks)

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

How To: 2 Tips to Make Windows Media Player on WM Suck Slightly Less

2

Understatement: Windows Mobile's default media player, Windows Media Player (WMP), isn't exactly iPod-class. One solution for this issue is to just give up on WMP completely and go with something like Pocket Tunes, currently our top pick for alternate music players (though we have more reviews of media players coming soon -- stay tuned). For some, however, having another media player isn't a great option due to either memory constraints or just plain personal preference. For you crazy folks, we offer two hints to make things a little better.

Hint the first: force WMP to actually remember your place in a track after you've exited WMP. This solution comes via a simple .cab plugin from XDA Wizard Wolfman-XP [via]. It's pretty much a necessity if you're using WMP to listen to audio books or, ahem, podcasts.

Hint the second: you've probably seen that there's a setting in WMP to allow for different skins, but on most devices there's just the default available and finding more is a hassle. Well buck up little camper: Chris Craft (aka Mr. 30 apps in 30 days) has collected his top 5 WMP skins here. We're fond of the $1.99 'Tweak' interface pictured above.

Bonus hint: make it known to Microsoft that the media situation is untenable and if they're planning on bringing that rumored Zune-like functionality they'd better get on it and right quick.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Prima Lateral Pouch Case for the Samsung BlackJack II

2
5 years ago

Can customs seize your Windows Mobile device?

0

A bit of hoopla was raised last week over border search policies disclosed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. In almost every news story, the word "laptop" was used in the headline. And this is true. Your laptop can be seized and its information inspected for an unspecified amount of time, no suspicion necessary.

If you're visiting WM Experts, you're probably a fine, upstanding member of society, and a model patriot and benefit to the American way of life, blah blah blah.

But the next logical question is, "Can they take my Windows Mobile device?" Check in after the jump for the answer, and for some tips that could save you some time and embarrassment. (Though if you're looking for a way to completely sneak one past the government and cause some shenanigans, you're at the wrong place.)

Welcome back. So can The Man snag your phone and look at your data?

The answer is: Absolutely. Along with just about anything (electronic or otherwise) you have on your person.

From the Policy Regarding Border Search of Information (pdf link), dated July 16, 2008 (bold section emphasized by us):

CBP [Customs and Border Protection] is responsible for ensuring compliance with customs, immigration, and other Federal laws at the border. To that end, officers may examine documents, books, pamphlets, and other printed material, as well as computers, disks, hard drives, and other electronic or digital storage devices.  These examinations are part of CBP's long-standing practice and are essential to uncovering vital law enforcement information. For example, examinations of documents and electronic devices are a crucial tool for detecting information concerning terrorism, narcotics smuggling, and other national security matters; alien admissibility; contraband including child pornography, monetary instruments, and information in violation of copyright or trademark laws; and evidence of embargo violations or other import or export control laws.

The policy isn't new, and it applies to anyone entering the United States, citizen or not.

Handling the information

So customs can snag your device, copy your data or inspect it on site, and there's not a whole lot you can do to stop them from doing so. If they find probable cause that you're up to no good, they may "seize and retain the originals and/or copies of relevant documents or devices, as authorized by law."

And your data can be copied and shared with just about any other governmental agency.

Copies of documents or devices, or portions thereof, which are retained in accordance with this section, may be shared by CBP with Federal, state, local, and foreign law enforcement agencies only to the extent consistent with applicable law and policy.

Absent probable cause, they can only keep information regarding immigration matters.

Other provisions

Windows Mobile is primarily still a business device, and businesspeople tend to travel with sensitive information.

There are provisions for "business information," though it doesn't say much more than "We'll do what we can to keep your stuff from falling into the wrong hands." And it adds that "Depending on the nature of the information presented, the Trade Secrets Act, the Privacy Act, and other laws may govern or restrict the handling of the information."

But we don't recommend claiming that the photos you took of the, er, entertainment, on your - cough, cough - "business trip" to Tijuana are proprietary information.

Attorney-client privilege is also addressed. While claiming such can't keep them from being searched, it should bring an extra level of oversight in the handling of your data.

Correspondence, court documents, and other legal documents may be covered by attorney-client privilege.  If an officer suspects that the content of such a document may constitute evidence of a crime or otherwise pertain to a determination within the jurisdiction of CBP, the officer must seek advice from the Associate/Assistant Chief Counsel or the appropriate U.S. Attorney's  office before conducting a search of the document.

What can you do?

The easiest answer is, leave your laptop or WinMo device at home. But that's not much of an answer, is it?

Here are a couple of simple solutions.

1. The cloud: We love the cloud. We talk about the cloud all the time. Store your data in the ether, and you don't have to worry about someone snagging it off your device. (Who has access to it way up the sky is a whole 'nother matter, but that's for another day.)

2. The ninja-stealth move: We'll keep saying it until we're blue in the face. Backup software is your friend, and SPB Backup 2.0 is perfect for this one.

It's as simple as doing a full - and encrypted - backup of your device, and saving that backup to a storage card (which you should already be doing) or, better yet, somewhere in the cloud (though the 20-meg or so file sizes could be a problem there).

Then, before heading back across the border, do a hard reset and wipe your device. When you get back home, restore from the backup, and you're right where you left off. No muss, no fuss.

The caveat

This isn't a foolproof way to keep your data completely out of the hands of, well, anyone but you, nor is it meant to be. If Jack Bauer wants to make sure you're not using your phone to make his next 24 hours a living hell, he's going to do so. (And, yes, we're well aware that it takes more than a simple reformatting to make data irretrievable.) This is just the equivalent of keeping a screener from riffling through your underwear in your suitcase, looking for a shotgun.

That said, there isn't a whole lot of legal precedent for this sort of thing yet, so there likely will be some bumps in the road.

Look, we certainly don't endorse transporting anything illegal over U.S. (or anyone else's) borders. And we're all for catching terrorists before they strike. So please don't view this as a way to circumvent policies and procedures meant to safeguard all of us.

But your data, your privacy and your Fourth Amendment rights are priceless, too.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Qualcomm Exec Sanjay Jha named Co-CEO of Motorola Handset Business

0

Sorry, Mr. Block, Motorola has decided to take their handset business in another direction. To wit: they've named Sanjay Jha their next CEO of their mobile devices business, he'll serve as Co-CEO with Greg Brown. Jha, we assume, reads email directly on the computer (unlike, according to rumors, his Co-CEO), as he's formerly of Qualcomm. There's a tiny twinge of irony here since Motorola recently ditched Qualcomm chipsets in favor of Texas Instruments. Then again, given Jha's Qualcomm roots, one could be forgiven for secretly hoping for Motorola devices powered by Snapdragon (Jha's understandably fond of the platform).

Jha headed up Qualcomm's CDMA technologies unit - which we take to generally be a good sign for Motorola if only because he will probably have experience navigating US law after all that 3G chip ban and patent fight craziness that went down last year.

Eventually, if all goes according to plan, Jha will be a CEO minus that “Co-” part, as Motorola still plans on spinning off their handset division into a separate company.

Good luck to you, Dr. Sanjay Jha. As I mentioned on my appearance on the T4 show last night, the Motorola Q9h is still my favorite smartphone of the past year or so; I still believe Moto has the chops to release another favorite. In the meantime, we wouldn't complain if you cleared up the mysterious disappearance of the Sprint Q9c.

Read: Cellular News

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Touch Diamond coming to Sprint this month?

1

The HTC Touch Diamond is coming to Sprint. We know this. We've just been waiting to find out when.

But those of you/us who have been patiently waiting to get your hands on an honest-to-goodness U.S. version may not have to wait much longer.

A Bloomberg article (via Engadget Mobile) notes in its final sentence that HTC "will begin selling the handset through Sprint Nextel Corp. in August."

Why, that's this month! Engadget Mobile also has reports that both Best Buy and Radio Shack are getting the Diamond in this month -- Best Buy on the 17th and Radio Shack on Sept. 2nd.

Other questions remain. Will it have the multi-faced "Diamond" back? We'll see. Pricing? Remember that Canada's Telus is offering the Touch Diamond for $149. That's in Canadian dollars - and with a three-year contract, which is the norm up there. It's going for $349 with a two-year deal. Do your own extrapolating from there.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Microsoft Releases WM API Scanner tool

0

Over at the WM Team Blog, msaffitz writes up the details on a great new tool for developers (and maybe power users): the Windows Mobile API Usage Tool. The basic idea is that it will scan a .cab file and then spit out all the APIs (the tools that programs use to interact with the core WM operating system) that program uses. Why is this useful? Well, not all APIs are created equal -- some are more efficient, some are better supported, and some are scheduled for the chopping block in future versions of Windows Mobile.

Definitely a must-download for any WM developer looking to keep their app up-to-date and potentially fun and interesting for enterprising power users who want to figure out which apps are doing what on their devices.

[via Smartphone Thoughts]

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

IBM spending $360 million on the cloud

0

We're big fans of cloud computing here at WM Experts, be it Google and the myriad ways to sync to it, Microsoft and its new Live Mesh, Dashwire, Yahoo Go, Apple's Mobile Me or any of a number of other ways to keep your data stored safely off your device and in the ether.

Friday's New York Times brings word that IBM (you've heard of them, right?), is spending $360 million for one data center in North Carolina and another in Tokyo to offer cloud services to corporate types.

Writes Steve Lohr:

The I.B.M. statement says its North Carolina facility will afford its lucky customers “unparalleled access to massive Internet-scale computing capabilities while gaining the cost and environmental protection advantages of I.B.M.’s industry-leading energy efficiency data center design.” Yes, yes, a veritable technological second-coming.

The future. It's coming. Eventually.

Read "Commercializing the Cloud"

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Congress will HANGUP on In-Flight Cell Calls

6

WME has discovered through the WWW that the HTIC of the USHR approved the HANGUP Act this past Thursday. If you can decipher all of that, then you too could be a U.S. Congressman.

Seriously though, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives approved the "Halting Airplane Noise to Give Us Peace Act. Dont bother with the calendar, its not April 1st. Thats really the name of the proposed law.

According to IT World.com the HANGUP Act would make permanent the long standing ban on such calls by the FAA (thats the Federal Aviation Administration) and FCC (the Federal Communications Commission). Flight Crews and USAM (United States Air Marshals) would be exempt from the ban. Indeed, the House of Representatives' Transportation and Infrastructure Committee has approved the act already.

While the alphabet soup seems to be over abundance in this story, the bill would stop in-flight cellular calls despite developing technology that would make such calls possible. Cellular calls while in-flight have been a illegal for some time due to concerns about interference the signals may have with on-board navigational and communications equipment. While other countries are moving forward to such services, Congress appears to be shutting the door on it.

Technology asides, Representative Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon and co-sponsor of the bill) states that there is another concern about in-flight calls. In a statement released by DeFazio, he states that, Polls show the public overwhelmingly doesnt want to be subjected to people talking on their cell phones on increasingly over-packed airplanes.

Opponents of the HANGUP Act agree that in-flight calls can be impolite but feel that you cant legislate courtesy.

The bill wouldnt ban internet access, email or text messaging in-flight. American Airlines recently launched wi-fi service in-flight and Virgin America plans to offer the same service by the end of the year. It will be interesting to see if you can use your wi-fi enabled cell phone to access this service or if you will have to pay a fee to use one of the airlines devices.

There is a ray of "hope" for would-be chatterers, though: DeFazio also added in his released statement that, With Internet access just around the corner on U.S. flights, it wont be long before the ban on voice communications on in-flight planes is lifted. Unfortunately he added, Cash strapped airlines could end up charging some passengers to use their cell phones while charging others to sit in a phone free section of the plane.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: IM+ for Windows Mobile Standard

7

I love to chat. In person, I sometimes have a hard time actually involving myself in a conversation. I am able to complete thoughts more easily behind the buffer of my chat program. Having the ability to chat on my BlackJack is a great tool as well, the

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Live Search to get a Rebrand?

3
3

Live Search to get a Rebrand?

Seems like every time we mention Microsoft's Live Services here we always start with the complaint that the branding is confusing, mixed, and/or just plain wacky. There's been a plan in the works since at least February to rebrand some of these services to clear up just what refers to what. According to Mary Jo Foley of ZDNet, that plan is still in motion.

First up, Live Search, Microsoft's straight-up search competitor to Google. It looks like Microsoft has begun asking users what they think of several new names, the leading contenders being:

  • Bing
  • Hook
  • Kumo (which means either “cloud” or “spider” in Japanese, depdnding on which Kanji characters are used)

Again, these are being floated strictly (we think) to rebrand the actual Search in Live Search and not necessarily the Live Search client, Live Mesh (Mac client for that is out now, by the way), or any of the other various services called “Live” out there. Ok, honestly we don't know, but that's our best guess. What we do know is that the URLs for all of the above are already taken and, really, it wouldn't exactly be a tragedy if Microsoft went another direction. Then again, they're all better than “Cuil.”

Here's our suggestion: Wythwo. As in: “Wish (that) Yahoo Thing Had Worked Out.”

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Take your smartphone for a swim, if you dare

0

";" alt="">

Monty Python fans, help us out here. If the iPhone floats, it's a witch, and it should be burned at the stake, right?

OK, OK. Maybe that's a bit harsh.

Making the rounds is the Golden Shellback splash-proof (or dunk-proof, apparently) coating, which appears to protect your device not just from the occasional spill, but from total immersion in water.

It appears to work just fine in these demonstrations, though it's not yet available to to the public. Don't believe us? Just watch the unholy iPhone work under water in the video above. And check out a demonstration from Thursday morning's "Today Show" after the jump.

And in the meantime, why don't you try out one of the great weatherproof cases in the WM Experts store (nudge nudge, wink wink).

All kidding aside, this could totally open up a new market to pirates, SCUBA divers, and those crazy dudes crab fishing in the Bering Sea. Because if it's on TV and the Internets, it's gotta be true.

Via

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

AT&T Disallows Peer to Peer on Your Smartphone

2

You already (should) know that your 'unlimited data' isn't actually unlimited in terms of sheer bandwidth -- every carrier has either official or unofficial data caps. Transfer more than, say, 5 gigs of data and you might be looking at a nasty call and an unceremoniously cancelled account. Add another limitation on to that there 'unlimited' plan: the type of data you're allowed to send or receive:

[AT&T] told the FCC on Friday that if they catch you using their mobile broadband network for P2P, they'll nuke your account. Specifically, senior VP of dealing with the government Robert Quinn said that “AT&T's terms of service for mobile wireless broadband customers prohibit all uses that may cause extreme network capacity issues, and explicitly identify P2P file sharing applications as such a use.” - Gizmodo

Exactly what qualifies as “P2P” is sadly (and expectedly) vague -- just apps on the phone, P2P on your laptop via a tethered connection, all are likely up for grabs. We're guessing that AT&T is feeling the pain of a 3G network that doesn't have the capacity for serious, heavy use by a large population, especially on the upload side of things. Yes, we probably have the iPhone to blame thank for AT&T sudden vulnerable feelings.

Thanks to Rene for the tip!

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Skype for Windows Mobile Now Compatible with 6.1

1

Skype's mobile client for Windows Mobile has been updated to 2.2, it now is compatible with Windows Mobile 6.1. GSM Arena put it through its paces and found it to work well over WiFi, over 3G not so much. Otherwise you're looking at a pretty full-featured client, with support for calls, Skype-out for calling regular numbers, Skype's text-chat, etc.

One downside that GSM Arena notes is that, unlike when making normal calls, the screen stays on during a call and is therefore likely to get “cheek taps” that might accidentally end your call. 'Course, that's not a problem for WMExperts' readers, because y'all know about the clever software that just turns your screen off with the push of an assigned button.

Download Skype 2.2 for Windows Mobile [via Gear Diary]

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

NuevaSync: Exchange Conduit for Google Calendar and Contacts

1

I've long been looking for a personal holy grail: using Windows Mobile's built-in support for Exchange Active Sync Push to access my information on Google. I had hoped that it would be MailShadowG, but it turns out that service is a desktop-only client that talks only to Exchange. Forwarding gmail to a 3rd party Exchange server is an option, but it's a hassle and doesn't usually provide a very good sync'ed up experience.

Enter NuevaSync [via], a free service that offers an Exchange server that is automatically synced up to Google Calendar and Contacts (Plaxo too, but let's leave Plaxo aside, eh?). They don't have email support yet, but they're working on it and it looks like they're going to do it right -- which is to say they'll be doing it via an IMAP gateway for proper folder sync.

Anyhow, once you've set up your NuevaSync account and connected it up to your Google account, the last step is to set up Exchange on your Windows Mobile phone, you can find those instructions here. Syncing Google's PIM to your device is well and good, but you'll need to also get that info synced from your desktop to Google -- we'll leave that as an exercise to the reader.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
Show More Headlines

Pages