Recent Articles

Headlines

5 years ago

WMExperts Podcast 10 - Q9h vs Q9c

12
12

WMExperts Podcast 10 - Q9h vs Q9c

Ask and ye shall receive, Sunshine. ...That's a real user name, we're not just being flip. Ok, we're being a little flip. Listen in for a 15 minute discussion comparing the Morotola Q9h (Full Review and First Look) and the Q9c (First look at the Q9m here, it's basically the same thing).

Shoot us an email at podcast@wmexperts.com with a question for next week's full podcast (which, truth be told, might arrive just a hair late, we're traveling again next week). Better yet, leave us a voicemail: 866-904-5882 x222

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Smartphone Round Robin: The Verdict on Windows Mobile and Contest Winners!

14

Today we're wrapping up the Smartphone Round Robin for good. Well, except for my own personal “bonus round” with the Nokia N95 ...and a later “which smartphone is right for me?” article at the main Round Robin site ...and we'll also be on the Mobile Computing Authority podcast next week. ...and we'll do it again next year with new devices. So though we ARE wrapping it up today by announcing winners(!), the truth is that the Spirit of the Round Robin will live on forever in all of us. Gag.

So here's the deal: At each of the four participating sites (WMExperts.com, PhoneDifferent.com, CrackBerry.com, and TreoCentral.com) you'll find the winners of the Smartphone Round Robin Contest announced, plus a wrap-up article about each platform with some closing thoughts from the editors.

So - after the break you'll get tasty, bite-sized verdicts on Windows Mobile from my compatriots plus my own thoughts on their thoughts - a Round Robin Roundup. And then you can post your thoughts on my thoughts on their thoughts, but I know that you know that they know that I know what we all know: Windows Mobile is still my favorite.

Winners!

A gigantic thank you to the communities of readers, members, and commenters at all of our sites. We started the Smartphone Round Robin to give back to you, but of course it was your comments and posts on our articles that were the real fun. From those comments and posts, we've randomly chosen the winners.

Congratulations to the winners of the Smartphone Round Robin Contest! Here they are:

Grand Prize Winner: RickMG

For this post, RickMG wins the grand prize: A smartphone of his choice plus $150 to spend on accessories in a Smartphone Experts online Store. So, RickMG - what's it gonna be? I'm telling you, take a long, hard look at the Motorola Q9c - it's thinner than that 755p ya got there, has a better browser (Default Opera Mobile!), and a little bird tells me that Sprint is serious about unlocking GPS features for all their Windows Mobile devices early next year. :D

Runners Up: Antoine of MMM, Bla1ze, and LFD153.

Our runners up (click on their names to see their winning posts) all win our runner up prize: $100 good at one of the Smartphone Experts Stores!

I (Dieter) will be contacting the winners later today via their registered email addresses - so heads up, folks, emails with “You Won!” often end up in junkmail. :)

...Let's move on, now, to the final verdicts on the AT&T Tilt (and Windows Mobile):

CrackBerry.com's Kevin Michaluk on the AT&T Tilt

Read Kevin's First Look and Final Thoughts on the Tilt

The Tilt was actually the first smartphone other than my BlackBerry I had ever experienced. I thought “withdrawal” would quickly get to me, but with Windows Mobile 6 running on the feature-packed Tilt I found myself able to do everything I could on my BlackBerry and more. The Tilt even supported BlackBerry Connect, so I was easily able to maintain the BlackBerry “Push Email” I have grown so accustomed to.

Though the Tilt offers tremendous capabilities, for me it fell short on delivering everyday usability. Part of this was the Tilt's form factor – it is about as far away from a BlackBerry as you can get. While the Berry is very much a one-handed device, the Tilt's slider form factor w/ touchscreen offered so many input methods that I never quite found a comfortable way to use it. Form factor aside, I didn't like the WM user experience. While the BlackBerry OS is designed for the way a mobile user works, WM still resembles a computer experience forced into a handheld. Everything I could do on the Tilt I could do two or three times faster on my BlackBerry and for 3x long (the Tilt's batter barely made it past 3pm). If you need WM capabilities and have the patience to tweak, a WM device is a great solution. If you want ease of use and the ability to get the job done quickly, think BlackBerry.

PhoneDifferent.com's Mike Overbo on the AT&T Tilt

Read Mike's First Look and Final Thoughts on the Tilt

Windows Mobile is an incredibly powerful smartphone platform. There's over 100 different phones to choose from. The default setup isn't very intuitive so you may want to check out one of the many 3rd party apps that “fix” Microsoft's mistakes choices. Every Windows Mobile phone apparently ships with a different set of software on it so no two are alike, hardware or software.

If you've got a lot of time and energy to put into a phone, this is an excellent choice. There's almost nothing you can't do with it, and anything you don't like about it, you can change, given the time and money to do so. So if you eagerly anticipate spending a lot of time researching which phone you want, and figuring out exactly how you want to tweak it once you do have it, Windows Mobile will be great for you. If there's a form factor you like that isn't available with any of the other smartphone platforms, odds are decent that Windows Mobile has one floating around. You just have to hope that the acronym soup of the phone matches the acronym soup of your carrier. Ridiculously powerful, and an easy recommendation to anyone that is infinitely patient or very savvy technically.

Using Windows Mobile is exactly like using Windows 95. If that makes you shudder, mission accomplished. If that makes you yearn for Windows Mobile, mission accomplished. Every wart is mitigated by an upside, and there are a lot of warts to consider with Windows Mobile, I'm prone to think that all the choices and decisions are paralyzing unless you already know exactly what you want. If capability and usability really are a tradeoff, Microsoft definitely erred on capability's side. If capability and usability are on a seesaw, capability is a 300 lb gorilla and usability's feet don't ever touch the ground. For all the negative things that I say about this platform, it's still my second choice. If I weren't technically savvy, it would be my last choice.

TreoCentral.com's Jennifer Chappell on the AT&T Tilt

Read Jennifer's First Look and Final Thoughts on the Tilt

The Tilt is a like a mini computer on steroids. It's packed to the hilt with everything you need and then some. The Tilt has enough bells and whistles to nearly deafen you with its built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, camera, slide out and tilting keyboard, and fast 3G. Coming from the Palm OS side of the fence, I appreciate the touchscreen and of course the built-in WiFi. I also appreciate that there are numerous 3rd party apps available for the WM device. The Tilt is a great device to have, especially if you don't want to be chained to your laptop.

Unfortunately, with all its power and features, the Tilt is a little sluggish at times. I guess powerful doesn't always mean speedy. The out of the box experience of the Tilt is a little weak. Some 3rd party apps go a long way towards bettering that experience though. You can find apps that let you use a lesser amount of taps to get things done. And you can find enough apps to tweak the Tilt just about any way you want it. The battery life was also a little disappointing. The WiFi really eats the battery up. Of course you can easily swap your battery out with a fresh one. If you're looking for a tweakable powerhouse that is feature packed with a great phone, here ya go.

WMExperts.com's Dieter Bohn on the AT&T Tilt

So the verdict from the Round Robin on the AT&T Tilt looks to be this: super powerful, super hard to use.

Hmmm

Well, yes, that's true and it's pretty much what I expected. Windows Mobile is a great business OS, a wonderful tweaker's OS, but not the easiest to use OS. The Tilt runs Windows Mobile 6 Professional - i.e. the version of Windows Mobile that is designed for touchscreens, often requires a stylus, and descends from the classic PocketPCs of old.

A common theme both here and in general with WM6Pro is that it's analogous to Windows on the Desktop. I think the desktop metaphor is unfair to Windows Mobile, actually, and I wish Microsoft hadn't encouraged it. WM6Pro has its own “User Interface Philosophy” that's separate from desktop Windows - it's not ideal, but it's certainly not a carbon copy. Honestly, I wish Microsoft had more fully abandoned the desktop metaphor on WM6Pro (I'm looking at you, Start Menu and “X” button).

WM6Pro is powerful, but unless you either “get it” or “tweak it,” it's bound to confuse you. I “get it” and “tweak it,” so I love it. Sometimes a company “gets it” and “tweaks it” before they even sell it (hi Windows Mobile on the Palm Treo!), which is helpful. I still refuse to say that Windows Mobile as a whole is not accessible to the average user, but the Tilt, well... it's pretty much not accessible to the average user. I'm not saying, I'm just saying.

Windows Mobile 6 Standard

What I'm saying here, basically, is I think we might have been better off if we'd chosen a different Windows Mobile smartphone, one based on Windows Mobile 6 Standard - the non-touchscreen version.

Windows Mobile 6 Standard has a 'back' button (which CrackBerry Kevin would love), seems to do a better job managing memory and open programs without hassles (which Treo Jennifer would probably appreciate), and has a more consistent User Interface instead of a mix of “start menu” and “programs folder” and so on (which would please iPhone Mike). It's not quite as powerful in most cases, though, but perhaps the Round Robin has taught us that power isn't everything. Plus - hotter form factors. :)

So next year, maybe that WiFi Motorola Q9h with Windows Mobile 6.1 will be shipped across the country for the Smartphone Round Robin. I know that I myself am realizing that I prefer the Standard, non-touchscreen version of Windows Mobile lately.

Conclusion

Meanwhile, despite the usability warts pointed out above, Windows Mobile is clearly the powerhouse of the entire bunch. The Tilt especially, which can do basically anything you could ask a smartphone to do - it just might not do it with the grace and dignity of the other platforms.

The thumbnail overview seems to be this: BlackBerry for email, PalmOS for simplicity, iPhone for media, Windows Mobile for power.

Want power? Get Windows Mobile.

Congratulations again to our winners and thanks again to Mike, Jennifer, and Kevin for doing such a great job reviewing all these gadgets in such a short space. Most of all, thanks to our readers and members who participated in the Smartphone Round Robin Forums here and elsewhere!

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: iGrip Cigarette Lighter Universal Car Mount

9
5 years ago

SlingPlayer Mobile Gets that Update!

7
7

SlingPlayer Mobile Gets that Update!

If you remember a few weeks ago we dropped the line that Sling was updating their PocketPC client and that they were aiming for a Christmas launch.

Well, looks like they came through as they just announced that new version, which has been making the beta rounds in the last 2 weeks.

Enough small talk, here's what's new. Basically a slew of new device support (full list after the jump) and some new stuff like:

  • Provided you install SlingPlayer Mobile using the .EXE file, it will once again sync Slingbox information between SlingPlayer 2.0 and SlingPlayer Mobile.

  • SlingPlayer Mobile can now perform major/minor tuning, which is often seen for those tuning digital broadcast channels (5.2, 5.3, etc.).

  • The new SlingPlayer Mobile also includes a roaming notification feature, which will let you know if your phone switches to roaming mode while streaming.

  • Updated channel logos.

Not bad at all!

Read More Here...

New Support for:

  • Sprint Treo 800w (US)
  • Sony Ericsson X1 (US & UK)
  • Palm Treo Pro (US & UK)
  • Sprint HTC Touch Diamond (US)
  • Sprint HTC Touch Pro (US)
  • Verizon HTC Touch Pro (US)
  • Verizon Samsung Saga (US)
  • Verizon Samsung Omnia (US)
  • AT&T LG Incite (US & UK)
  • AT&T HTC Fuze (US & UK)
  • AT&T Samsung Epix (US & UK)
  • HP iPAQ 910 (US & UK)
  • AT&T Pantech Duo (US)
  • Sprint Samsung ACE (US)
  • Verizon XV6900 (US)
More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Insaniquarium by Astraware

0
0

Review: Insaniquarium by Astraware

Had a long day? Work gotcha down? Need a pointless game for your Windows Mobile device that will put it all in perspective? Astraware’s Insaniquarium ($19.95) might just do the trick. Astraware puts a fish aquarium on your screen that is nothing short of, well, insane.

To see how Insaniquarium washes out, read on!

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Look for the T-Mobile Shadow II on Jan. 28

1

We’ve been expecting the (delayed) T-Mobile Shadow II to make its appearance late next month, and now there’s a Jan. 28 date tacked on to that, courtesy of a release schedule leaked to the Boy Genius Report. We’re also still expecting Windows Mobile 6.1 and access to T-Mobile @ Home. 3G support out of the box is still doubtful.

That’s about it on the Windows Mobile front, unless there’s something to the Motorola Renew, which is slated for a Feb. 4 release. Otherwise, there’s the photo-centric Samsung Memoir, a BlackBerry Curve, and offerings from Sony Ericsson, Samsung and Nokia.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Seidio Hold n' Store Crystal Case for the Mogul

4
4

Review: Seidio Hold n' Store Crystal Case for the Mogul

At the beginning of the year I reviewed Seidio's Super Slim Hard Case for the Mogul, followed by a review of Seidio's Clip Holster for the Mogul a month later. After 9 months, I am still using both. The challenge with that is that these two do not work together. To answer this Seidio does have a clip holster that will hold a Mogul with their Super Slim Hard Case. Seidio calls it Hold n Store Crystal/Rubberized Case Holster for the Mogul.

I am going to take a look to see if these two items can work well enough together to gain my trust to hold my phone securely without any fear of it falling out of the holster. Read on to see what I have found.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

T-Mo Dash in Black Nears Official Status

0

There it is, folk, an official-looking product shot of the T-Mobile Dash in black. As we told you before, there's literally nothing new here except the paint job. Same EDGE data, same 200MHz processor that frankly does better than you might expect, same T-Mobile branding. Let's hope that we're at least going to get WM 6.1 on it out of the box.

Here's our question, though: T-Mobile has likely finished up their UMA/T-Mobile-at-Home/call it what you like, but we call it VOIP software for the Shadow II, why not toss that on this Dash refresh as well, to justify the stealthy black look?

[via Engadget]

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Welcome to the new WMExperts!

26
26

Welcome to the new WMExperts!

 

Welcome to the new WMExperts!  We've worked very hard to keep everything you loved about the old WMExperts here and awesome, including review archives, podcast listings, forums, and more.  What we've done is added a bunch of great features on top of that -- not to mention the new look.  Come on in and see what's new!

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Mobi Battery Cradle for the Mogul / PPC-6800

1
1

Review: Mobi Battery Cradle for the Mogul / PPC-6800

It is sadly a common trend where a WM phone does not come with a cradle in the box. This holds true with the PPC-6800 as well. We then are left with just a plug or USB cable, and trying to find a safe place to place the WM phone while it is charging. This also means that many of us enter the third party after market looking for a cradle to put on a desk or nightstand. The challenge with this is discovering which one works good, and especially, which ones do not without having to buy each one to find out. I think I can help you a little with this as I tested the Mobi Products Cradle that will also charge a spare battery.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Verizon Relents! GPS to Open Up Next Year!

32
32

Verizon Relents! GPS to Open Up Next Year!

Ok, we're totally not going to take credit for this, but it looks like people who have joined our campaign to demand Verizon unlock GPS on their Windows Mobile offerings are receiving a stock reply that's looking, well, good! User efudd sends us his reply from the Big V:

Verizon Wireless, like all carriers, orders devices to meet certain specifications inclusive of features. Each of these specs is tested to determine if it meets our performance goals. There are instances when the phone will pass our extensive testing process but a specific feature may not meet the standard. We will often choose to introduce the phone without that feature but ask that the manufacturer come back to us with revised software that has to be tested to make sure the service works the same across our entire wireless footprint --from Maine to Hawaii. In the case of open standalone GPS, we are partnering with the Windows Mobile device manufacturers to provide a software upgrade that will add this capability to the existing assisted GPS capability. This is a complex development project to provide open standalone GPS while maintaining the assisted GPS capability with the level of performance and security that our customers expect. The recently introduced Windows Mobile devices including Omnia, Saga, and Touch Pro are targeted to add open standalone GPS in the 1st half of 2009.


Steve Schwed
Verizon Wireless
HQ Executive Relations Supervisor

Emphasis ours above. That's the Omnia, Saga, and Touch Pro, yo. That's complete, open, standalone GPS. Heck, we're even going to grant the point (because we should) that implementing GPS on the latest generation of fully-integrated chips is really tough these days. Still, chalk this one up under the Win column.

This isn't WMExperts taking credit though, because, well, it looks like our strategy of physical, snail-mail email wasn't the right strategy (Thanks for nothing, US Postal service -- at least when email fails, we get an error message). This was all you guys, the heroes. Heck, maybe Verizon meant to do this from the get-go (they have been claiming they intend on being more open), but a little pressure doesn't hurt!

Big ups to our readers and big ups to Verizon for doing the right thing.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Parrot MINIKIT Bluetooth Speakerphone

2
2

Review: Parrot MINIKIT Bluetooth Speakerphone

For those that are afraid of Bluetooth headsets, options are limited when attempting to comply with various state and local laws regarding operating a cell phone while driving. A speakerphone of some sort, whether built into the car or a third party product such as Parrot’s MINIKIT, is probably your best option.

We’ve reviewed several speakerphones here at WMExperts. Jabra’s SP700 and SP5050 as well as Motorola’s T305 are all notable entries in this remarkably underserved market. With the MINIKIT, Parrot takes the hands free experience up a notch by integrating voice recognition technology. This may or may not be a big selling point, considering many Windows Mobile phones (including my AT&T Tilt) come bundled with Microsoft’s Voice Command or similar software. But the fact that this functionality is built into a speakerphone of this quality, makes the deal just that much sweeter.

A detailed review of all the features follows after the break.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Review: Flexmail 4

8
8

Review: Flexmail 4

Back in the Windows CE days, the majority of devices that were available were of the touch screen, non-phone variety. I never really found any value in those days to syncing a couple thousand email messages to my old iPaq. Things have changed a lot since then. With all of the connectivity options available to us these days, it is pretty much a no brainer to have some sort of email access from your Windows Mobile device.

Microsoft is one of the industry leaders in all aspects of the email conversation. Their Exchange Messaging Server is one of the first choices for most Enterprises because of it’s close integration with Microsoft’s other products. Outlook and Outlook Express are some of the most commonly used email clients.

In the Windows Mobile side of the world, Microsoft has given us a mobile version of Outlook. To this point however, the mobile version is almost entirely bereft of the more powerful features of the desktop or even web-based versions of Outlook. Enter Flexmail 4 by WebIS (the makers of Pocket Informant).

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
5 years ago

Round Robin Review: T-Mobile G1

50
5 years ago

Silverlight Approaching Windows Mobile Release?

0

We've been waiting for Microsoft's Silverlight since, oh, April of 2007. Since then, we've seen demos, had our expectations raised, brought back to earth, and raised again. Well now it seems that the mobile version isn't too much further off. Turns out it was slipped in sideways inside a Windows Live photo gallery 'Community Technology Preview' that leaked out.

Silverlight seems to have lost some of its initial momentum of late and nobody is claiming that it's going to take down Flash. However, as we said back in June (seriously, a long time we've been following this stuff) when we saw a WeatherBug demo, Silverlight has the potential to bring some whiz-bang UI to WM. Would be nice to see it.

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
Show More Headlines

Pages