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The Daily Show takes on Google Glass: 'Do you hear what you're saying?'

The Daily Show takes on Google Glass: 'Do you hear what you're saying?'

The Daily Show has turned its satirical lens onto Google Glass. Stories of Google Glass Explorers getting attacked, harassed, and expelled from venues are nothing new anymore, though to the average person seeing somebody walking around with Glass, it can be a touch unnerving. As Comedy Central's The Daily Show is apt to do, they dug into that uncomfortableness with comic results.

(Video is US only, sorry)

Of course, The Daily Show's take on the whole thing is one of absurdity. It's The Daily Show, we'd expect nothing less. But they are also exploiting real concerns about Glass and the soon to be wave of similar "face computers".

"Except our cameras have red lights on them, big crew guys operating them, you signed a release for a national TV show… otherwise, the exact same thing, yeah."

The majority of the piece, not to mention the concern with Google Glass, centers around that: the camera. To make the absurdist point, correspondent Jason Jones wore a cobbled-together headset with an iPhone, instant camera, and microphone, and then walked out in public with it. The results were, as you can imagine, amusing — people aren't going to look at such things as 'normal', and while headsets like Google Glass might someday be part of the norm, it's not something that the public at large is necessarily comfortable with at this time.

And it doesn't help that The Daily Show picked up some Glass wearers that were all too willing to push the bounds of what would be considered acceptable by actively recording when out and about. Not that it's any different than people doing the same thing with a cell phone — it's just that you can use both of your hands.

Source: The Daily Show

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Reader comments

The Daily Show takes on Google Glass: 'Do you hear what you're saying?'

80 Comments

That's why it's US only... Because someone said to themselves, 'You know what, screw Europe, they don't get to see this video because the US is better!'

Figured I'd chime in as an Explorer. Funny sketch. But it's worth nothing that:

You can't really record much on the device. The battery doesn't last that long, just like a phone wouldn't. I think I maxed at around 30 minutes of recording a public event once, from 100%. Nobody with this device goes and records everything they see; it's a waste of space and battery life. Probably an obvious statement, but worth pointing out.

The device is primarily useful as a second screen to your phone. If I get a text, I can see it and reply to it without having to pull out my phone. If I get a call, it acts as a bluetooth headset and I can see the caller ID. It's nothing special, nothing crazy. But pretty fun to make fun of.

Agreed.

Even as a tech nerd, Google Glass makes me uncomfortable. Take off that camera, or at least put a big cover on it that is extremely conspicuous when it opens up. Also, throw a big red light on that thing.

I think you can. The way it's receiving unnecessary backlash for the camera alone, Google would be nuts to remove it.

And modifying it would be limited to a small set of people, since modifications to explorer devices void the device warranty, and even if Google gets the consumer edition down to $200 - $500, very few would be willing to risk turning it into a non-replaceable paperweight.

No, that's all not worth noting as that is very far besides the point and blatently obvious: battery will get better over time, as new versions come out, so does the camera, and nobody can see what you use that rubbish on your head for, so people are forced to make their own conclusions or expectations. What people don't like and what annoys people is the fact that anyone with Google on it's head is by default Always aiming a camera at you. I don't enjoy having a camera pointed right at my face whenever I talk to someone, or having people shove their silly google glass camera's in my face if I pass them in the street. The many security camera's are already stretching it. Atleast when someone's aiming their phone at you, you know what they're doing; it's obvious.

The thing isn't just anti-social, its a complete social barrier and an annoying one at that. It has a few unwanted features that the wearer doesn't have an issue with (the camera is faced outwards obviously) but that those that have to interact with a wearer are by default a victim of, with no possible way around it, besides avoiding the person in general. If there's a bunch of poeple that fail to see the implications of wearing a camera right on your face like that, pointing at everyone, those people have some serious social defects. By wearing something like this, you will make the majority of people around you feel uncomfortable and if anyone thinks that's decent human behavior, I think they have a pretty severe social disorder.

It's beyond selfish to put a thing like this on your head and think the world will just accept it. Remove the camera and people will just consider you impolite. Just like it's impolite to keep checking your watch when talking to someone or it being impolite to look away, or that its considered impolite if you look at your phone every second when talking to someone. It's basic social convention and it shows two things: people wearing google glass are anti-social and selfish and Google as a company doesnt comprehend, accept and respect global social conventions. Seriously; if this simple point is not obvious to anyone... Then I feel deeply sorry for them.

+100, Smartphones are already bad enough in many social situations. Smart watches may be too in the future. But putting an all-in-one device right on your face is even worse; terribly rude and uncomfortable for everyone around you. Glass may have a future in certain work environments, but definitely not as a convenience device for general consumers. I hope Google realizes this. New and different doesn't always mean innovative and appreciated.

My god, take a chill pill...

"I don't enjoy having a camera pointed right at my face whenever I talk to someone, or having people shove their silly google glass camera's in my face if I pass them in the street...when someone's aiming their phone at you, you know what they're doing; it's obvious."

It has a little red light, last I read, that notifies people it's recording. And people in the street aren't "shoving" in your face. They're walking by. Shoving it in your face would be literally them putting their face within inches of your face, if you use the non-literal expression of "shoving", rather than its literal form.

"The thing isn't just anti-social, its a complete social barrier and an annoying one at that...those that have to interact with a wearer are by default a victim of, with no possible way around it, besides avoiding the person in general. If there's a bunch of poeple that fail to see the implications of wearing a camera right on your face like that, pointing at everyone, those people have some serious social defects. By wearing something like this, you will make the majority of people around you feel uncomfortable and if anyone thinks that's decent human behavior, I think they have a pretty severe social disorder."

Ok, first off, you just told anyone who wears or wants to wear glass they have a social disorder. Not cool. Not cool at all.

Second off, you're not a victim. You're not being hurt when you meet someone with this. There's a little red light, based on what I read, that notifies of recording. So what. Big deal. For all we know, that guy with a Bluetooth headset could be recording audio of everything, yet we don't make a fuss about that, because we know it's unlikely. And headsets don't even have an indicator...

"It's beyond selfish to put a thing like this on your head and think the world will just accept it...Just like it's impolite to keep checking your watch when talking to someone...or that its considered impolite if you look at your phone every second when talking to someone. It's basic social convention and it shows two things: people wearing google glass are anti-social and selfish and Google as a company doesnt comprehend, accept and respect global social conventions. Seriously; if this simple point is not obvious to anyone... Then I feel deeply sorry for them."

Okay. First they have a serious social disorder, then they're selfish? Well, how would you feel if I called you a, idk... A "sociopathic dickwad"? Answer: At best, minorly insulted. Which is why I'm not going to. Just like you don't know these people, I don't know you. I'm not going to make judgments based on what you say or wear.

You also miss the point of glass. Now you don't have to check your watch or you phone during conversations; worry about texts from mom or emails from your boss; what the time is or if you need to get an umbrella. With glass, you can be free to continue a conversation without ever looking away, and when something important happens, you are notified without ever grabbing your phone. So now you know the time while chatting with your friend; You know your boss canceled the Johnson project and that you need to leave in five minutes to get to work and print up your report; you know that it's going to rain soon and that picking up an umbrella to use after the party would be useful. You don't have to look away, and you can continue conversations without worry. It's a device to free you from these social barriers, not to create more.

Not to mention, you miss the ENTIRE point of the camera. It's for capturing moments you never could before. That baby's giggle. That split second of something awesome. Those little things that are enjoyed yet forgotten, because they don't allow time to get your smartphone, unlock it, and open a camera. Even on a Windows Phone, with the camera buttons, there is delay between pressing it, unlock, and camera launch. There's been many a moment that I went to take a picture, but by time my phone was unlocked and camera opened I had already missed it. With Google Glass, you don't have to miss it. A few taps/gestures on the headset or a simple voice command is all it takes, and it's recording. You no longer have to miss these small, yet extraordinary moments.

No one is going to be recording every moment of the day. Battery life can improve, but no way in hell will they improve the battery life for all day recording. The longest lasting smartphone, I'm willing to bet, will have it's battery drained before days end if you were to record video all day. This is a headset were talking about. They typically don't have much room for batteries.

And those who try to record everything and everyone for their own purposes are unlikely to be regular users of this technology, even if it fails to go mainstream. Those will be the creeps and those with social disorders that you so wish was the entire user group. Not the average user.

So please quit throwing names and calm yo rear down. Chill. This isn't anything new in the realms of privacy and such. It's just implemented in a new way.

@Dustin Hodges
Read your post and it sounds like an ad for Google Glass. Tense is a 100% correct. I'm sorry that you either lack the common sense to understand that or you simply have no respect for others around you. The same way most people don't want the government intruding in their daily lives by placing cameras on every street corner is the same way people feel about those walking around basically as Google monitors.

My point is that they don't even know what it is our how it works. I do have respect for those around me. But this is absurd. You're not being recorded. Your privacy isn't being invaded. This is in no way disrespectful.

New technology like this will always make those around it weary at first, but it's natural. It's new. It's unknown. You know it's not recording and that it has an indicator light, but they may not. But that's why it's so important for people to adopt this tech and to use it in public. People won't understand it if it's banned from every reputable establishment and no one uses it. People need to have their interests peeked so they will proceed to learn more about what it is and what it does, not to buy it, but to know that it's safe and nothing to relatively worry about.

Ok, first off, you just told anyone who wears or wants to wear glass they have a social disorder. Not cool. Not cool at all.

 

Just because it's unpleasant doesn't mean it's wrong.

To be clear, I think Glass or a similar product could be quite useful in certain professional contexts, but wearing one in public seems likely to remain a massive etiquette breach for quite some time.

Yes I was wrong about social disorder. It's obviously the completely wrong term to use and I should have used "personality disorder" instead. My apologies, English is not my native language.

I honestly do think that anyone that's wearing Google Glass and isn't aware of the social effects has a some sort of personality disorder, may it be being antisocial or more towards anxiety, I do not know. However for me; there's no other way to explain it and nobody has proven me wrong thusfar.

What you put forward is an explanation of the technology. The technology is interesting but it's not ready for the real world yet, as it contradicts basic global social conventions that we've built up over the last thousands of years. I really do not think it's a misunderstanding of technology that's annoying people. People understand it just fine. They just interpret the technology differently. The tech is also not really new; my phone already notifies me of rain or other crap falling from the skies, so does my watch. But needing them so badly that you have to put them on your FACE to be distracted by them right in any social situation you might find yourself in is simply textbook anti-social behavior. I am glad I have a choice as to when I decide to read my notification too.

I'll put this as simple as I can for you: when you talk to me (or anyone for that matter) with that google stuff on your face; it's an invasion of my privacy due to the camera. So, it's not physically being hurt, but my privacy sure is. And people somewhat value that still. It's annoying and aggravating to many people for a damn good reason. 

But this is just a minor part of the annoyance. What annoys me most is that wearing glass and interacting with people is like watching TV while someone's talking to you. It's like looking on your phone every second while having a conversation with someone. It's like talking to someone outside of your car with the windows rolled up and the radio on. It's (before the time of computers) like watching your watch every second while having a social interaction with someone.

If I talk to someone, in whatever form imaginable, in whatever social situation. I do not want them to be distracted by some random notifications floating between me and the person I'm talking to. I don't want them to have a screen in front of their face, between me and them. This is not new; before there were computers there were similar issues with watches, newspapers and many other items that could distract from a social encounter. It's basically impolite and shows no respect to the person you are communicating with in real life.

So! I will never talk to someone that's wearing Google Glass, no matter who they are or what their purpose is. They will take it off, or I will avoid or ignore them for two reasons: I do not trust people like that in a social situation. And I consider it impolite to have such a distracting and frankly annoying item floating around.

On a sidenote: if someone like you calls me anything, I grinn and move on with my life.

I was wrong about social disorder. It's obviously the completely wrong term to use and I should have used "personality disorder" instead. My apologies, English is not my native language.

For someone who wants to talk about what's socially acceptable, you sure do like to be antisocial by telling people they must have disorders or are antisocial. Clearly kindness is not your native language either. Just stop digging that hole of yours. You can't dig your way out.

I honestly do think that anyone that's wearing Google Glass and isn't aware of the social effects has a some sort of personality disorder, may it be being antisocial or more towards anxiety, I do not know. However for me; there's no other way to explain it and nobody has proven me wrong thusfar.

No one has proven you right either. All that's been proven is that people are cautious and are uneducated on the exact details of the technology (recording time, indicator light, methods of recording, etc...). In no way has any one proved that people wearing this technology has some disorder.

What you put forward is an explanation of the technology. The technology is interesting but it's not ready for the real world yet, as it contradicts basic global social conventions that we've built up over the last thousands of years.

Social conventions change. What's norm today changes tomorrow. You think it was normal to talk in public on a cellphone when they came out? No. Society changed to fit the technology. The same will happen here, permitted it picks up enough steam upon public release.

I really do not think it's a misunderstanding of technology that's annoying people. People understand it just fine. They just interpret the technology differently.

As the saying goes, the devil is in the details. People understand the basics just fine, but the details are where things are muddled. In this case, that's battery life, methods of recording, the indicator, and practicality.

To paraphrase the great Sherlock Holmes: Data, Data, Data. They cannot make bricks without clay.

The tech is also not really new; my phone already notifies me of rain or other crap falling from the skies, so does my watch. But needing them so badly that you have to put them on your FACE to be distracted by them right in any social situation you might find yourself in is simply textbook anti-social behavior. I am glad I have a choice as to when I decide to read my notification too.

Here is where you completely missed the point. Your phone does ask that, but you must break what you pointed out as "normal social convention" to check that information. The point of an augmented reality heads up display, such as the Google Glass, is to integrate data into everyday life and social convention in a non-disruptive way. You won't be distracted by the days as it's integrated neatly and seamless into your current situation. Why do you think Google went with peripheral view over a full lens covering the entire plain of view?

I'll put this as simple as I can for you: when you talk to me (or anyone for that matter) with that google stuff on your face; it's an invasion of my privacy due to the camera. So, it's not physically being hurt, but my privacy sure is. And people somewhat value that still. It's annoying and aggravating to many people for a damn good reason.

By this logic, owning a cellphone, talking near a laptop, our using a Bluetooth headset are all invasions of your privacy. It's only an invasion if its recording. Otherwise, it's a pointless piece of glass lens that just sits in a plastic casing. You feel that it's being invaded, but the facts state that is not.

But this is just a minor part of the annoyance. What annoys me most is that wearing glass and interacting with people is like watching TV while someone's talking to you. It's like looking on your phone every second while having a conversation with someone. It's like talking to someone outside of your car with the windows rolled up and the radio on. It's (before the time of computers) like watching your watch every second while having a social interaction with someone.

Once more you miss the point. It's not like any of these things, as it's purpose is to seamlessly integrate with your current situation and everyday life, as to get specific information from specific sources when it matters most, while still avoiding the disruption caused by other devices to standard social convention.

If I talk to someone, in whatever form imaginable, in whatever social situation. I do not want them to be distracted by some random notifications floating between me and the person I'm talking to. I don't want them to have a screen in front of their face, between me and them. This is not new; before there were computers there were similar issues with watches, newspapers and many other items that could distract from a social encounter. It's basically impolite and shows no respect to the person you are communicating with in real life.

They're not random notifications. It doesn't just push every piece of information to the device. It gives you information from specific circles, such as a text or email from an inner circle of a set number of people. A call (which will interrupt social convention with or without glass. All glass does is greatly reduce the length of time that convention is disrupted, especially when the call is ignored.). A number of features require you to actually manually or vocally operate the device, which doesn't apply to social situations. Normal use in social situations is limited and condensed to a specific set of information that is deemed important.

On a sidenote: if someone like you calls me anything, I grinn and move on with my life.

My troll-dar is in the yellow here. Not sure if trolling, our just rude. =_=

The only thing you are doing is pointing out how anti-social you are and how you look down on the less tech-savvy. That's sad on it's own already but you actually seem to think this is the issue here. But you are very mistaken. It's basic social behavior that you fail to comprehend, that has nothing to do with technology. Nothing at all.

I'm done with this. You seem to think it's socially acceptable to call people antisocial, fail to understand the details of the technology, acting paranoid and claiming antisocial behaviors based on what you've proven to be a skewed, if not completely inaccurate, view on how the technology works.

I've got news for you: You're the antisocial one. Calling names, telling people they must have a serious disorder, and judging people for the technology they use, acting as if they should change a part of their lifestyle to meet your views, which honestly sounds no different in principle from people wanting the government to ban homosexuality based on infringement of religious freedoms.

It's Google's name for us, not ours. I guess the idea is that we're exploring a new kind of technology. And in a way, we are explorers, because we're the people who get to experience the backlash of people who disagree with our use of experimental technology.

But I don't invade anyone's lives, because I don't record anything outside of my own home. If they're paranoid, they should educate themselves, not live in fear. But I have yet to meet someone who was actually offended by the device, so keep in mind this hysteria is more limited than you would think.

I dont care what anyone says wearing google glass looks stupid.I just hope the people wearing it dont own guns.

It could be worse, they could be called peeping toms - that's exactly how it feels if you're at the other end of Google Glass.

Would love to watch the video.  Too bad most of the WP readers cannot.  The USA is the centre of the world I guess. 

It's a US based show. WTH is the deal with you and the rest of the world always complaining and making BS comments about the US. Guess what, there's just as much going on outside of the US that we don't have access to and you don't here us crying about it not being in the US. If yall hate the US so much, quit using US products and wait for your country to give it to you. BTW, yes, my little patch of the US is the center of the world.

I'm not in the USA, I can see it though (and it was on TV here). I think any country where comedy central is available can watch this. So it's not USA only; just licenced to places where comedy central (or this program) is licenced and active.

I think Google Glass is truly highlighting the limits in "practicality" of mobile devices in our daily lives.

"Do you guys hear yourselves when you talk?" Jones said. "An interface between you and the real world? Those are called eyes."

 

Win.

Yeah, I am able to see it in Portugal too (which makes sense since the show airs here on Prime Time in one of the biggest News Channel)

I love how everyone tarnishes Glass for the camera but there hasn't been a peep about the Galaxy Gears camera which is way less conspicuous...

Gear user here. Less conspicuous, but impractical for its own reasons. Auto focus isn't fast, so it would be hard to get a quick spy shot that isn't blurry. The shutter sound can't be turned off, so any would-be secret shooters would give themselves away pretty easily. Lastly, it's only a 1.9 megapixel with a fairly wide viewing angle, so it's not like someone could take a clear shot of someone from across a room and blow it up later. I know the tech will get there, but right now it's a novelty for most.

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Ugh, I hate it when people get all upset over this sort of stuff. I'm too cheap to pay for google glass, but whoever comes out with a cheaper version will probably get my dollar. Yes, be worried, you are on camera, however I think you have more to worry about with all the cameras around town than the glass cams. Oh no somebody took video of you in a bar, but you didn't care about the hi-res security cam behind the bar or out on the street?

Not concerned about the one one the street corner or behind the bar. Chances are those videos or images are not going in someone's private collection. Pretty soon you are going to see laws governing the use of these devices. Last thing I would want is some Glasshole taking pictuers in a public or resteraunt restroom. How would you know or stop them from violating privacy there?

 

I tried on Google Glass a last week and wore it for 10 minutes. Did all sorts of testing of features. Worked very well, but left me with a headache the rest of the day. Somehow I felt like a character in the Steve Martin comedy "The Jerk". I wouldn't even be surprised to see a class action suit filed against Google by users of Glass sometime in the future.

I always knew google glass wasn't going to do well, the UI is clumsy, its ugly, too intrusive, invades privacy, screen is too small, not useful enough...  It just isn't going to work anytime this decade.