Browse better

Here is how to block ads in IE 11 for Windows 8.1

General News

UK government set to rush through emergency surveillance legislation

Microsoft News

Simplifying its terms, Microsoft wants you to understand what you agree to

Microsoft News

Microsoft awarded top marks for protecting user data from prying governments

Microsoft News

Apple, Google, Microsoft increasingly defying U.S. government, informing customers of data demands

Microsoft News

Microsoft: it's time for an international convention on government access to your data

Microsoft News

Microsoft files suit against Acacia over smartphone and mobile computing patents

Windows Phone News

Microsoft launches marketing campaign to help keep your email private

Microsoft News

Microsoft joins forces with Google to sue the US government over surveillance transparency

Xbox

Xbox One will be able to run without Kinect plugged in - tin foil hat wearers rejoice

Podcast

ZEN & TECH 57: From NSA to cameras everywhere: Coping with privacy violations

Xbox

Xbox One: Details emerge on licensing, online connectivity, and privacy

Windows Phone News

Privacy risk: WhatsApp for Windows Phone tags your geolocation metadata to saved photos

Windows Phone News

WhatsApp found to breach Dutch and Canadian privacy laws

Windows Phone News

Advocates and activists write open letter to Skype amongst privacy concerns

Windows Phone News

Taking back control of your privacy: Microsoft to the rescue

Windows Phone News

Bing beats Google in partnership with Facebook's Graph Search

Windows Phone News

Fraud case dropped by angry Nokia shareholder

Windows Phone News

Microsoft tightens rules surrounding customer privacy and personal data collection

Windows Phone News

Don't want Verizon collecting information on your mobile activity? Opt-out now.

0

Safe! Police need a search warrant for your phone

If there is one thing Windows phone users know, it's that their little device can hold a whole lot of information. Whether it's e-mail, personal finances, PIN codes, documents, or naked drunk pictures of yourself at that office holiday party, these mini computers can contain a vast resource of information about our personal lives (and those around you).

While a lot of security issues on smartphones revolves around potential thievery, e.g. remote wiping or spyware, one area up till now has been gray: Do the police have a right to search your phone, even when arrested?

At least according to a recent Ohio Supreme Court ruling, no the police cannot search your phone. Like other areas such as car and home searches, police are required to get a search warrant first.  To quote the NY Times:

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled this month, by a 4-to-3 vote, that the search violated the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable search and seizure. Rather than seeing a cellphone as a simple closed container, the majority noted that modern cellphones — especially ones that permit Internet access — are “capable of storing a wealth of digitized information.”

Expanding upon that notion, there is no need to distinguish between "smartphones" and "dumbphones" either as all phones will be covered, ruling out potential areas of dispute in court.

Of course the flip-side is law enforcement will argue that this will make their job harder, something to which we sympathize.  Regardless, we are quite pleased with this decision.  (Counter argument: we're trying to think of situations where remote-wiping could be nefariously employed here once the phone is in possession, but not searched yet by the police.  Hmmm...)

Either way, would you trust that guy (above) with your tricked out, custom Touch Pro 2 with stealth-tethering hack?  Heck, no ...

What are you thoughts?  Sound off in comments...

[via NY Times]

0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

Register or Login to add comments