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11

Samsung holds strong support for Microsoft & WP7

Samsunholds strong support for Microsoft & WP7
With Nokia deciding to partner up with Microsoft and jump onto the Windows Phone 7 runaway train with other leading manufacturers, one would consider the possibility that the partnership between Nokia and the software giant could enable them to receive favourable treatment over other manufacturers. At worse, this could cause issues including handset makers pulling support for WP7 or doubting their investment because of favouritism (extremely unlikely but worth the minute consideration).
Samsung have reiterated that their support for Microsoft and the platform will continue regardless of what may occur (probably because they are selling well). Chief Strategy Officer at Samsung, Omar Khan, explained in an interview at the Mobile World Congress trade show "You can continue to expect expansion in our Windows Phone portfolio." Moving onto say "Anything that strengthens the Windows Phone ecosystem is good for us," which is ultimately true.
As well adding more competition within the WP7 device market, an additional handset manufacturer could well increase developer and carrier interests in the platform itself. For now, Samsung will more than likely sit back and enjoy the sales increase for their devices - particularly the Focus and Omnia 7.

With Nokia deciding to partner up with Microsoft and jump onto the Windows Phone 7 runaway train with other leading manufacturers, one would consider the possibility that the partnership between Nokia and the software giant could enable them to receive favorable treatment over other manufacturers. At worse, this could cause issues including handset makers pulling support for WP7 or doubting their investment because of favoritism (extremely unlikely but worth the minute consideration).

Samsung have reiterated that their support for Microsoft and the platform will continue regardless of what may occur (probably because they are selling well). Chief Strategy Officer at Samsung, Omar Khan, explained in an interview at the Mobile World Congress trade show "You can continue to expect expansion in our Windows Phone portfolio." Moving onto say "Anything that strengthens the Windows Phone ecosystem is good for us," which is ultimately true.

As well adding more competition within the WP7 device market, an additional handset manufacturer could well increase developer and carrier interests in the platform itself. For now, Samsung will more than likely sit back and enjoy the sales increase for their devices - particularly the Focus and Omnia 7.

Source: Forbes

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Reader comments

Samsung holds strong support for Microsoft & WP7

11 Comments

Interesting to note that OEMs who have success with WP7; Samsung and HTC, are planning to stick with WP7, while those who haven't or likely won't make a big splash with the platform; LG, Acer, and Asus, are waffling. It could also be that Samsung and HTC are able to demand a premium for their devices while pushing them out in higher numbers than the others.While I'd love to see more OEMs working on WP7 phones, of the companies sticking with the platform, Samsung, HTC, and Nokia are really the only three companies who have produced high end hardware in recent memory that looked and performed well. Interesting to think that we could be seeing a bit of a hardware class divide with WP7 OEMs.

While I'm hopeful that Samsung will manufacture more WP7 devices, it begs the question why no new WP7 handset devices showcased at MWC, even if the devices won't be released for a few more months? They have a stable full of Android devices, and they were arguably the most successful OEM for the WP7 device launch...Consumers clearly are on board with Samsung WP7 devices - can we have more, Samsung?

I do have to admit that I'm a little bummed at the lack of new WP7 devices being showcased, but then again it just came out in November. At the end of the day I love my Samsung Focus, but really hope for a Dell Venue Pro type of device minus the Dell part.

I agree completely with the previous statements. I would also like to add that the formula for Samsung's success and HTC's success is quite simple. Produce a real nice processor and chassis like the Samsung Galaxy and mass produce it to extinction. Change a name here, an OS there, and the transition between any OS including Bada or MeeGO are simple. Any one noticed the pics of some of the new phone hardware from LG and Samsung only have three buttons and now have a "Social Hub". The manufacturers don't like the Microsoft OS but Android does, enough to imitate it. What we can deduce from this is that the likes of Samsung and HTC will always produce WP7 phones, it just won't be at the forefront of their development. At least the Nokia deal will definitely bring us WP7 supporters - one day - much needed hardware brags.

I still think that Microsoft needs to have only ONE hardware manufacturer, like Apple does. This way the phone will be designed from the ground up for Windows Phone OS. Even though the phones out for it now are great, they all have some sort of gimmick..a slide out keyboard, speakers that come out from the back,..stick with the Apple formula and produce a beautiful high end phone that people will want and flood the market with them. But on ALL carriers..not one just one or two..

I disagree. I think MSFT has found a really good balance between Android's complete openness and iPhone's completely closed system. They have a OS very well integrated with the hardware through hardware standard control (min. specs), but provide a diversity of devices that the iPhone doesn't. Some people might not want any phone bigger than 3.7", while others want one with at least 4"... some people want a keyboard, others don't. iPhone doesn't provide this kind of choice to consumers, and Android is too fragmented. There's no advantage for MSFT to create one single "Microsoft phone" and effectively dictate to users what their phone should look like.

I don't think Samsung is scared of the Nokia/Microsoft partnership at all. Samsung is well aware of their mind-bending hardware development and are probably very confident that they will have the goods to hold a strong position in the sales field. I mean, they have their "own" dual-core processors, they have Super AMOLED Plus displays, they have the brand recognition, they know how to build a 8.5 mm thick dual-core phone, and so on and so on. Of course they are not threatened by Nokia on first hand :-) And If Samsung gets to sell more phones (outside the Android market) they're not backing down. It's understandable.

From what I read somewhere before, I'd be confident, too, after their experience with the Motorola/Android deal. If it was true, Samsung was leading in Android sales over Motorola and, yet, I don't think I had seen one Android ad from Samsung on TV (Galaxy Tab is the only one I can remember, but the lead happened before then). Of course, part of that was Motorola's fault for naming their line "Droid," making non-tech-savvy people disassociate the commercials with Motorola and associate it with Android in general (I'm sure there were many on the other carriers who went "Droid" because of the commercials). So, yeah, I'm not surprised they're not worried.

It's important to keep in mind that such statements in the long run are meaningless. This is simply Samsung not burning bridges. They could do a 180 tomorrow if the economics favored it with absolutely no consequences except perhaps for a bad word in WPCentral.As for Andriod "copying" WP7, that's a tradition in the industry as exemplified by Microsoft and Apple. Hardly worth a mention.