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T-Mobile's 'personal' Uncarrier 7.0 event to be held at San Francisco store on September 10

T-Mobile's 'personal' Uncarrier 7.0 event coming Sep 10

T-Mobile's scheduled their next Uncarrier event (this one being Uncarrier 7.0), and they're holding it on September 10th. The tagline for this event? "This time it's personal"… whatever that means. Unlike previous Uncarrier events, which have taken over convention spaces and theaters, this one is being held at the T-Mobile retail store at the corner of Market St and 3rd St in San Francisco. It's a little store. In fact, the sidewalk outside might be bigger than the store inside.

T-Mobile's walking into the fire here, though, with Apple's likely iPhone 6 and maybe iWatch event scheduled for the preceding day](http://www.imore.com/apple-announces-september-9-special-event), and sure to be still consuming media coverage around the nation.

At the last Uncarrier event we saw not just the unveiling of T-Mobile's week-long network trial, but also their exemption of streaming music services from data allowances. What T-Mobile and CEO John Legere have in store for the 10th, we're not sure, but we can bet it'll be full of bombast and swearing.

Source: TmoNews

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Reader comments

T-Mobile's 'personal' Uncarrier 7.0 event to be held at San Francisco store on September 10

63 Comments

If it's that personal, I hope it has something to do with individual plans, wishing something big for both old and new customers. Crossing my fingers and toes!

That was my guess as well. I hate that all the carriers have awful individual plans. Not all of us have families yet.

I definitely thought about the personal assistants here. Cortana, Siri, Google Now... maybe no data limit on them?

This time its personal... Maybe this time they will add some sites like facebook and twitter to their music streaming exemption to data thing that they have going.

As much as you think that behavior is good, it violates net neutrality. Ultimately it's bad.

Yes, because heaven forbid we be allowed to use an extra 1 or 2 GB of data for our own pleasure for things like music and facebook. Hell, what are they thinking? We should pay T-mobile 5 cents every time we access facebook. Death to better deals!!

"This is the most insidious type of net neutrality violation, because it’s being pitched as a benefit. Most users stand to gain from the free data, so they may not even care about the slippery slope they’re on."
"T-Mobile tries hard to look like it’s putting an arm over your shoulder, but “music freedom” is actually more of a stranglehold."
-Jared Newman, TIME Magazine.

What people don't seem to get is that this really isn't a net neutrality thing. All T-Mobile plans [ eligible for Music Freedom ] have unlimited data. What you pay for is how much of that unlimited is at 4G speeds. TMobile realized many people were using up their 4G speed data for Music, and as such, is working on bringing unlimited 4G speeds to music services. They aren't charging anyone for Music Freedom. They aren't even charging the services to use the unlimited 4G. For it to be an issue of Net Neutrality, there would have to be an exchange of funds between T-Mobile and either the Music Service provider or the Consumer.

And inb4 "Why are there limited services eligible then?": They can't just flip some magical switch to allow all music streaming at 4G speeds. They have to work with each music streaming service provider to be able to differentiate between streaming and non-streaming data (since with services like iTunes you can also download movies, music, and games.). They also have to work with these providers to ensure their authenticity and legal status.

To summarize, this isn't like fast James in that it's the complete reverse. You're not getting unlimited 4G data and having services throttled unless they pay. No, you're getting LIMITED 4G data, and offering specific services unlimited data at 4G speeds free of charge.

What people don't seem to get is that this really isn't a net neutrality thing. All T-Mobile plans [ eligible for Music Freedom ] have unlimited data. What you pay for is how much of that unlimited is at 4G speeds. TMobile realized many people were using up their 4G speed data for Music, and as such, is working on bringing unlimited 4G speeds to music services. They aren't charging anyone for Music Freedom. They aren't even charging the services to use the unlimited 4G. For it to be an issue of Net Neutrality, there would have to be an exchange of funds between T-Mobile and either the Music Service provider or the Consumer.

And inb4 "Why are there limited services eligible then?": They can't just flip some magical switch to allow all music streaming at 4G speeds. They have to work with each music streaming service provider to be able to differentiate between streaming and non-streaming data (since with services like iTunes you can also download movies, music, and games.). They also have to work with these providers to ensure their authenticity and legal status.

To summarize, this isn't like fast lanes in that it's the complete reverse. You're not getting unlimited 4G data and having services throttled unless they pay a fee. No, you're getting LIMITED 4G data, and specific services with unlimited data at 4G speeds free of charge.

What people don't get is this this really is a Net Neutrality thing.  And if they think otherwise they probably don't really understand Net Neutrality in the first place.

 

And they can just flip some magical switch that would allow all music streaming, they could raise the throttled data limit after you hit your cap to 260kbps - which would allow all streaming services to function that could operate at that bandwidth without putting themselves in the poisition of violating Net Neutrailty by picking winners and losers and showing favoritism.

 

First off, that isn't some magical switch. You won't be able to stream high quality songs on a throttled connection. And some services don't work well on throttled connections.

Second, they are not picking winners or losers. Any music service can apply to be eligible for Music Freedom, and afaik they aren't charged a dime.

The point of music freedom is to be able to stream music without limits, and even if a service "functions" at slower speeds, it's by no means unlimited. Furthermore, by making data used by music streaming separate and unlimited, any data you use to stream isn't counted towards your monthly 4G data allotment.

At WORST/BEST (depending on how you look at it), Music Freedom falls into a Net Neutrality "grey area", since its not exactly clean cut as far as issues go, being that there is no charge for the service and that eligible plans are unlimited anyhow, but at the same time they are still essentially creating a fast lane (even if it isn't paid for and is the reverse of the feared Fast Lanes internet providers wish to implement).

No "grey area" about it.  Some services are selected, others are not, and the way they are going about it will make it impossible for that to ever not be true.  It will be a pepertual violation of the tenants of Net Neutrality until they wise up and knock it off.

And if 260kbps doesn't include enough, than make it 340kpbs.  just be fair about it.  What they are doing now is not fair.

I've now taken two ethics in computer science courses and I think you are taking this a bit too far mate lol

I see your point, but in debating Net Neutrality here you have to first take into account Tmobiles approach in how they manage their data.

I love ethics btw :D but I just don't see the argument here for the slippery slope

So while T-Mobile's move will be perceived as an altruistic and competitive one — "Music should have no limits," Legere says — it's important to look at this as a domino, a seemingly innocuous tile that's rocking back and forth. At the end of that long domino line lies a weird, broken, disjoint place that looks nothing like the internet we know today.

-Chris Ziegler, The Verge

In the core of my being I believe the internet should be free for everyone on the planet. Much in the same way we're all born with the ability to speak and the will to do so freely. The path this behavior sets us on leads to an inevitability that limits speech, limits idea sharing and puts ownership on the access too the paths too information. We all know (or should know) knowledge IS power.

You're not realizing once you allow special pathways for data, special speeds or data allowances to some websites or service providers and not others, you segment and segregate the entire internet! Say you start a new internet company. Say for example it's a music streaming service. If you can't afford to pay internet and cellular providers, in this case T-Mobile for their "special" music streaming exemption treatment, how are ever going to compete? It is a massive slippery slope where ALL internet users around the work loose and internet and cellular provider win by charging more money to be a part of the "fast lane club" and by gaining more control over how people use the internet by nudging and steering people towards some sites/services and not others. The internet Needs to be neutral so We can decide how we want to use it. Decide which services and sites we want to patron. Look it up, Netflix just caved in and signed an extortion deal with Time Warner to get their video streaming service into customers' homes without buffering. This is after already being forced into paying similar fees to Verizon, AT&T and Comcast. Do some homework, spend some time thinking about how you feel about all this, but most importantly wake up and smell the roses.

How am I not realizing when you say "afaik"? You don't even know factually that T-Mobile isn't profiting from this new feature. They don't even need to charge the services for them to profit from this practice. It doesn't matter if T-Mobile is charging the music streaming services, it's still bad behavior and sets a bad precedence. What happens when AT&T, Verizon and Sprint try to compete with this feature?

AT&T / Verizon cant compete like this because they don't have true unlimited data. Tmobile DOES, they just throttle you down to 2G once you pass your paid limit. I think that's the only real factor here because they are not charging you extra.

"governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, and application"

Ok so they aren't charging. Discriminating? perhaps, but to what extent? they did research, saw which were the top music streaming applications and announced those first, then they said ok now our CUSTOMERS can vote. Maybe we are the ones discriminating then? lol

Also for a network to remain non-neutral requires either that the customers not be concerned about the particular non-neutralities or that the customers do not have a choice of providers. or else the customer switches to a carrier with less restrictions. Which as a business you can see where Tmobile is saying hey hey hey come here this is a perk we'll give you because so and so carrier doesn't do it.

Idk im just saying the net is already non neutral. look up Best-Effort Network and that says it all lol nodes are blocked, file transfers are favored and so on. This all happens behind our backs -_-

I will admit you're right about the Best-Effort Network and things being favored on networks behind our backs as a practice that's already going on. But to say AT&T and Verizon can't compete is nonsense. They have it within them to decide to do exactly what T-Mobile is doing. Each has chosen not to offer as you say, "true unlimited data". They just as easily could. Also being non-neutral doesn't equal more restrictions. In this case T-Mobile is being non-neutral and offering less restriction.

And you are right that they CAN. but will they? hmm idk I doubt it. They have a much bigger subscriber footprint than Tmobile, imagine if they're customers knew they could stream Pandora unlimitedly? bandwidth issues, you know all the girls with their iPhones would leave Pandora playing 24/7 anywhere they go lmao I can see it already.

anyway, this debate is kind of tough for me as I reside in the US. here we hate the carriers lol a lot of us see Tmobile as the underdog who is pushing the buttons of the big two and trying to challenge prices and hopefully one day we get the same carrier reform that the European system has :/

ahhh the day all the carriers use the MetroPcs system for example (here in Miami I have great Metro coverage, but their WP options slack)

and to add to that.  This kind of "picking and choosing" practically requires the carrier to actively spy on, monitor, and categorize your internet traffic.  And in the case of T-Mobile they have started utilizing Carrier IQ again (now that the negative attention on that program has died down) and have gotten themselves into the business of collecting device telemetry and monitoring app usage as well.  None of this would be needed if they just provided a data agnostic dumb pipe like Net Neutrality advocates desire.

You don't understand, ultimately this will hurt competition and push users to use only a few music services, if we allow it now it will be harder to stop ISPs from throttling later

I'm excited. Free Windows Phones for everyone. "You get a Windows Phone. And you get a Windows Phone. And you get a Windows Phone. And you..." Yay, we all win!

Hells yeah! Haven't you heard? She loves Windows Phone. Oh and Ballmer will be there, running around screaming. He's the "Hype man."

Why does the CEO look so plasticized in photos? Bad light? I have nothing against him, I believe TMO is firing up a revolution in pricing, @Rodneyj, noted this as well.

I'm all for more aggressive pricing plans to shake up the duopoly of Verizon and AT&T.
Just wish infrastructure buildout was part of it.

Now there's an idea. Maybe in addition to upgrading their current network, they'll also expand it.

Last I heard they are working on converting and refarming most all their 2G service for 4G. I mean, there are still places TMobile could stand to provide service for, but there's many areas where 2G service is available.

Price wars and competition are GOOD for business! ;) And consumers win! But I will say as a personal anecdote: Thank you T-Mobile! My Verizon bill has come down considerably because of you ;) (and no, I'll never switch)

Too bad they're coverage blows where I live or I'd switch carriers in a heartbeat and save some serious money every month.

John will take off his skin suit and force himself upon the CEOs of all three telecoms while singing Yankee doodle dandy in the middle of the San Francisco store.

But seriously, I think this might have nothing to do with Apple in particular. Could just be the introduction of an uncarrier move that will help people take advantage of all the recently announced hardware, Windows phone included.

It's not about whether AT&T or Verizon will do something similar to T-Mobile. You and I don't know. We'd only be speculating. The point is what's the end result if they do? Because they are certainly capable of doing so. On a side note I also use MetroPCS (T-Mobile's network) with an unlocked AT&T 920 and enjoy great 4G LTE speed and service coverage (Los Angeles).

If it's big n personal then, it should be new windows phones, not one but more.... Cross my fingers. Lol