battery drain

There's a discussion going on over at the Windows Phone Central forums that has us a little concerned about the Lumia 920's battery performance. Some are seeing their batteries being sucked dry in a few hours while some aren't seeing any issues.

Our Dan Rubino refers to his 920's battery life as fantastic and I would have agreed up until today when my 920 barely made it six hours on a full charge.  Oddly the back of my Lumia 920 became warm during throughout the morning.  Made for a great hand warmer but I'd trade cold hands for better battery life any day.

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There's a discussion going on in the WPCentral Discussions Forums about the Nokia Lumia 900's battery life. It appears that some Lumia 900 owners aren't experiencing the greatest of battery life from their new Windows Phone.

Tweetwp7 reports that their HTC Titan's battery would be around the 60% level at the end of the day while the Lumia 900 is at 45%. Red Grenadine, on the other hand, reports fantastic battery life.

Personally, I had stellar battery life on my Lumia 900 for the first five days and that's with heavy use trying to compare the Lumia 900 with the HTC Titan II. Then the other day the connectivity issues struck and my battery life dropped like a rock. I'm seeing about 40% left after eight hours of use where the Titan II is in the 55-60% range.  In the time it took to write this article (about twenty minutes) I saw the Lumia 900's battery drop 3%.

In checking out the battery performance using Nokia's Diagnostic Tools (you can install them by dialing ##634#) my battery discharge rate ranges from 100mA to 500mA while the Lumia 900 is sitting idle (no wifi, BT, no live tiles, no apps running in the background, etc). Now I'm no electrical engineer but that doesn't seem right.

There could be a direct correlation between the connectivity issues and the battery drain or it could be a separate issue all together. We'll have to wait and see when the fix rolls out in the next few days to see if the battery performance improves as well as the data connections.  Our fingers will be crossed that it does the trick.

If you've seen a change in your battery performance on the Lumia 900, feel free to sound off in the comments or over in this WPCentral Forums discussion.

Thanks, everyone, for the tip!

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Abhinav Pathak, a computer scientist at Purdue University, Indiana, and colleagues have concluded that free smartphone apps with in-app advertising may lead to the battery being drained at a faster rate, compared to paid apps. What's interesting (and slightly alarming) is the team discovered through testing that Angry Birds, Free Chess and NYTimes only used 10 - 30 percent of the battery power for core functionality.

Using the Android Market as the test grounds for the research, the team found that 25 - 35% of the app power consumption went to third-party advertising code displayed in apps for developers to make ends meet. In the case of Angry Birds, 20% is used to display and run the game, while 45% of the power is used finding and uploading the user's location with GPS, followed by downloading location-appropriate ads over a 3G connection.

This is something to consider when next browisng any smartphone marketplace. The findings will be presented by Pathak at the EuroSys conference in Bern, Switzerland, next month. Be sure to check out the full research documentation as it's fairly lengthy, but interesting.

Source: Microsoft Research, via: NewScientist

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Is the AT&T Microcell sucking the life out of your Windows Phone batteries? Apparently there are a few Windows Phone owners who believe so.

For those not familiar, AT&T's Microcell is a gadget that picks up your cellular signal and carries it over your local internet service. It is designed for households and businesses that are in poor reception areas.

A short discussion has developed over at AT&T with one commenter stating with the microcell plugged in his battery drain on his Samsung Focus S is in the neighborhood of 15-20% per hour. Unplug the microcell and the battery drain pulls back to about 1% over two hours.

Now we are not certain if those complaining are using their microcell for data or connecting to their wifi internet network. If they are relying on the microcell for data, that could contribute to the increase drain.  But not knowing for certain, this is only a guess.  Personally, I've had an AT&T Microcell since day one (without it I only have half a bar of coverage at the house) and have yet to notice any increase in battery drain on any of the phones in the house.

AT&T hasn't commented on this issue and if there is a bug with some of the microcells, hopefully it can be addressed quickly. Curious, has anyone experience faster battery drain rates when your Windows Phone is connected to the microcell?

Source: AT&T; Thanks, Ronald, for the tip!

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