court

A German Court has ruled in favor of Nokia in litigation against HTC for patent infringement.  The Munich I Regional Court handed Nokia a Germany-wide patent injunction against all HTC Android devices (including the HTC One) that infringes on Nokia’s patent on connecting devices over NFC or Bluetooth to transfer resource information such as a URL (European Patent 1148681).

Under German law, HTC can appeal this ruling but must convince an Appeals Court that they are “more likely than not” to succeed with the appeal.  In the meantime, Nokia can choose to enforce the injunction on a provisional basis by posting a $400 million Euro (a little over $552 million U.S.) bond just in case HTC wins the appeal.  This would include a recall of infringing devices from resellers and commercial users.

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Finnish manufacturer Nokia has scored a victory against HTC today with a British court ruling in its favour over mobile telecoms technology. The judge concluded that HTC had infringed on a European patent held by Nokia - "Modulator structure for a transmitter and a mobile station." Nokia has been in a dispute against HTC in the past, as well as Apple and other tech giants.

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I know what you're thinking, "Oh, not more patents!" Believe me, we wish we could simply forget about the business altogether and focus on technology and innovation, but we're talking about multiple corporations here. Microsoft is battling it out against Google and are currently in a strong position. This has been reinforced with ZTE becoming the 20th company to have taken a royalty-bearing Android license. 

Today the Munich Higher Regional Court rejected Google's (Motorola) appeal against Microsoft's injunction against Motorola, which was granted back in 2012. The patent in question is EP1304891 on "communicating multi-part messages between cellular devices using a standardized interface." The lower court's ruling has now been affirmed by the appeals court and so the injunction remains in place for the foreseeable future.

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More information has come to light on the drama unfolding between Nokia and HTC. The Finnish manufacturer was granted a preliminary injunction against the HTC One due to an identical microphone component being installed by ST Microelectronics. It has now been found that HTC isn't to blame, but the component provider for breaching the contract with Nokia.

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We're not talking patents, but Nokia has dealt yet another blow to HTC. The Finnish handset maker has been granted a preliminary injunction by the Amsterdam district court, regarding technology utilised by HTC in its flagship device - the HTC One. It's boasted that the HTC One sports high-amplitude microphones, but this is the same dual-membrane technology that Nokia uses in its Lumia family of Windows Phones (we've even looked at the Lumia 920 vs HTC 8X recording a live event).

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A group of companies led by Microsoft are calling on European authorities to launch an antitrust investigation into Google. The motion behind the move is the search giant's hold over the mobile industry with Google services on smartphones.

The group (called FairSearch) of 17, which includes Nokia and Oracle claim that Google is acting immorally by giving away the Android mobile operating system to OEM partners with the requirement for its software and service applications (Google Maps, YouTube, etc.) to be installed and prominently displayed. 

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Samsung got served.

With a slow day suddenly getting very exciting, the jury-verdict for the Apple versus Samsung case is just coming in over the wires.

Like the trial itself, things are quite complicated as the verdict is spread over various devices, including the Captivate, Continuum, Showcase, Gem, Indulge, Infuse 4G, Mesmerize, Vibrant, Galaxy Tab and others.

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Your honor, we present Exhibit A

Today are the closing arguments in the highly watched Apple versus Samsung patent trial, meaning there is a lot of ‘Law & Order’ type drama occurring. Or at least that’s what we like to believe in reading the many live-blogs that are covering the case right now.

Probably one of the most entertaining moments came from Apple’s lawyers who were presenting their final case to the jury. At around 1:38 PM PT their lawyer, Harold McElhinny, evidently held up a unspecified Nokia Lumia Windows Phone and exclaimed...

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Say what you will about Microsoft and Apple but the two companies either appear to be the only adults in the room or alternatively, they have formed an alliance against Android. Or maybe both.

Evidence has come forth in the Apple-Samsung trial that the former has licensed so-called ‘design patents’ to Microsoft, which indemnify them against lawsuits from Apple over their Windows Phone and Surface tablets. This may partially explain why Apple was trying to collect patent royalties from Samsung in their late 2010 offer to the company.

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In the ongoing saga between Samsung and Apple, documents came out late last night from the court case that detailed a proposal by Apple to charge Samsung for royalties on their smartphones.

It’s interesting for a few reasons. For one, Apple almost never enters into cross-platform patent royalty deals with other companies, specifically if it is tied to any of their “product differentiating” technologies. Back in 2010 though, Apple was willing to make an exception to this with Samsung because they are a major parts supplier for Cupertino and they wanted to preserve that relationship. Apple was also “shocked” at just how much Samsung was willing to allegedly copy the iPhone.

In the documents, Apple spells out some license terms it was willing to offer Samsung back in October 2010—just a few weeks before Windows Phone 7 became available.  Although Android was offered a $24-per-device royalty fee, which yes, is extremely high, Apple evidently also wanted $9 per ‘Windows Mobile 7’ device as well.

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Earlier this year Microsoft was brought into the geo-location controversy along with Android and the iPhone, but remained vigilant that no foul play was present. Earlier this month the software giant was attacked again by a lawsuit claiming the camera app in Windows Phone collected and sent location information without prior permission.

Microsoft denied the claims with a firm statement:

"Because we do not store unique identifiers with any data transmitted to our location service database by the Windows Phone camera or any other application, the data captured and stored on our location database cannot be correlated to a specific device or user. Any transmission of location data by the Windows Phone camera would not enable Microsoft to identify an individual or 'track' his or her movements."

Now Rafael Rivera over at Within Windows has posted his own findings that backs up the lawsuit against Microsoft. He found that packets were being sent by the camera app to Microsoft's Location Interference service. What's being sent? OS version, device information (make, model, etc.), local wireless access points and various GUID-based identifiers. 

However, there are a lot of remaining questions: Is Microsoft collecting this data or just pushing it back? What happens when you disable the location service in the camera? (Ansewr: it appears to stop this behavior). In short, it looks like the first time you run the camera app, it gets your location from Microsoft, but once you disable it, that's that.

Check out his full report via the link below. What do you make of Microsoft collecting location data?

Source: Within Windows

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File this one under "you've got to be kidding me!" but a proposed class action lawsuit has been filed in Federal Court alleging that Microsoft is tracking customers through the Windows Phone camera. No... seriously.

The claim has Microsoft intentionally designing the camera software to ignore customer requests to turn off you location services and send it to Microsoft anyways. Early this year, Congress was concerned about privacy issues and technology. In response to these concerns, Microsoft wrote Congress and assured them that they only collected geolocation data with the express consent of the user.

Mrs. Rebecaa Cousineau, the plaintiff of record, claims "Microsoft's representations to Congress were false." Mrs. Cousineau further claims that Microsoft transmits data that includes approximate latitude and longitude coordinates of the user's device while the camera is activated. The lawsuit, brought about on behalf of all Windows Phone 7 users, is asking for an immediate injunction, punitive damages and other remedies.

Microsoft has yet to publicly respond to this latest round of litigation. It's true that your Windows Phone camera can record your GPS coordinates to your pictures EXIF file but you can also turn that feature off as well as the overall location services on your Windows Phone.

Whether or not you are truly turning these feature off has yet to be determined.

source: Reuters

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Late last night, HTC took the time to release an official statement in response to the Apple lawsuit recently filed.

Sounding a bit like an old Family Guy episode, HTC respectively disagrees with Apple's claim that it has infringed on its patents:

“HTC disagrees with Apple’s actions and will fully defend itself. HTC strongly advocates intellectual property protection and will continue to respect other innovators and their technologies as we have always done, but we will continue to embrace competition through our own innovation as a healthy way for consumers to get the best mobile experience possible,” said Peter Chou, chief executive officer, HTC Corporation. 

Of course HTC was not going to address the content of the claim specifically (save that for the courts) nor were they going to go "ya got us!" either, so in a lot of ways, this is no news.

Still, after rehashing their admittedly impressive track record of innovation in the smartphone business, this is just the beginning of the ordeal and we're sure it'll get more interesting in a few months.

Anyone ready to see Phil reporting from outside a court room? Full press release after the jump.

[via AndroidCentral]

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