intel

If you picked the Lenovo Miix 10 tablet out of the box while blindfolded, you might guess it is a Samsung product – and not in a good way.

The Miix 10 is an Intel Atom Window 8 tablet that comes in at $479, but our hands on time with the unit was less than stellar.  From build quality to pricing point it was hard to get excited about the Lenovo Miix 10.   Read on to learn more about Lenovo’s latest Windows 8 consumer tablet.

More →
4
loading...
15
loading...
20
loading...
0
loading...

Love it or hate it, Windows 8 is an operating system that is trying to break new ground. Microsoft’s move to rethink their world famous platform is the grandest risk and endeavor that the company has ever taken. For those of us on Facebook, think of when an update is released and brings minor changes, but a major user backlash. The idea that people don’t enjoy change is just one of the battles the Redmond company faces as it climbs the hill to a new beginning.

More →
4
loading...
38
loading...
45
loading...
0
loading...

Microsoft really wants consumers to put down their iPads and pick up its own ARM based Windows RT devices. So far, we have seen aggressive campaigning against Apple’s portable computing tablet. Now, Microsoft plans to cut the cost of Windows RT licenses and make tablets running the operating system even cheaper; this intel comes from anonymous sources, as the exact pricing for Microsoft’s Windows RT operating system is confidential.

More →
5
loading...
14
loading...
29
loading...
0
loading...

Image courtesy of The Verge

Today Dell announced its latest carbon fiber and aluminum creation, the XPS 11. The manufacturer’s latest machine features a beautiful design and 2560 x 1440 resolution. In addition, Dell takes a cue from Lenovo’s IdeaPad YOGA and introduces a hinge that allows the screen to flip back 360-degrees behind the keyboard.

Did we mention that Dell flattened the keyboard so much that you might confuse it with a Microsoft Touch Cover? We don't know about you, but to us, one of the main factors laptop machines still have going for themselves, over their tablet counterparts, are the keyboards. Why Dell, why?

More →
2
loading...
15
loading...
13
loading...
0
loading...

Acer’s Aspire S7 has been one of the most beautiful Windows 8 Ultrabooks we have seen to date; today, the company announced an update of the machine with Intel’s latest Haswell CPU.

The S7 was a near perfect machine (see our mini-review) and the latest revision updates the two biggest complaints with the notebook – low RAM and terrible battery life. The new Haswell microarchitecture features a new advanced power-saving system that should give the system a bit of a boost in the mobility department. In addition, Acer has increased the battery from 4,680 mAh to 6,280 mAh (an almost 35% boost). As far as the RAM is concern, it has been doubled from 4GB to 8GB – perfect for anyone needing to get some intense Photoshop work done.

More →
3
loading...
11
loading...
12
loading...
0
loading...

Head on over to web retailers like Newegg or Amazon and you’ll see that the cheapest Intel based tablet you can buy running Windows 8 is about $430 (Acer Iconia W150). That’s not too bad when you consider the potential of the system with the ability to actually install desktop applications. But what if we could go lower than the $400 dollar mark? Totally possible according to Intel’s CEO.

More →
8
loading...
96
loading...
88
loading...
0
loading...

Intel has published a job opportunity on LinkedIn that points the finger out to Windows Phone engineers. Now, this could be nothing, so we'll not speculate on an x86 Windows Phone is definitely on the horizon, but there are straws to be clutched onto. Could we be seeing Intel looking at the mobile platform as a potential investment to tackle? Don't get your hopes up.

So what exactly is Intel looking for in applicants? The company is specifically requesting Windows Phone expertise.

More →
1
loading...
19
loading...
39
loading...
0
loading...

Even though Microsoft wasn’t exhibiting at CES this year, doesn’t mean they haven’t been present. From Steven Ballmer taking to the stage at the Qualcomm keynote to some surprise Xbox 360 demos, it’s been busy.

The folks at Computer World caught up with Greg Sullivan. senior product manager for Windows Phone. Seems Greg was eager to share the good news about Windows Phone sales in China and also led some to speculate on a Windows Phone in the pipeline that uses an Intel CPU.

More →
7
loading...
30
loading...
62
loading...
0
loading...

Lost in the fuss over the launch of Windows 8 news we overlooked this the other day. Angry Birds in space is now available in the Microsoft Store.

Can you be an “app store” without at least on version of Angry Birds being present? If that’s the yard stick then many will breathe a sigh of relief to see the game pop into the store right from launch day!

More →
2
loading...
31
loading...
40
loading...
0
loading...

Yet another day, yet another roundup of somewhat exciting news involving Microsoft.  We’ll summarize the stories for you to keep you abreast of what’s going on in the world of Redmond. Today’s stories we found interesting:

  • Intel CEO remarks that 20 Windows 8 Tablets are coming this fall
  • Microsoft is back with a new keyboard dubbed ‘the Wedge’ (and mouse)
  • Windows Phone will grab 4% market share in the US in 2012?

Head on past the break to get all the info…

More →
0
loading...
3
loading...
29
loading...
0
loading...

Intel's press conference at CES 2012 looked exclusively at ultrabooks running Windows 8. That might be a bit of a let-down for those of us primarily interested in smartphones, but we're starting to see how the super-slim, super-light computers will collide with the tablet world. 

The announcement of Windows 8 already painted a picture in that direction, but the hardware shown today displays even more overlap with tablets.

For one, there's touch control. Intel unveiled a number of ultrabooks which would make use of a touchscreen without requiring it as a primary input, as on a tablet. PCs have been trying this for awhile, and laptops too in the pre-iPad tablet days, both without particularly great results. What might make ultrabooks more successful is their slim size and hardware layout. One ultrabook Intel showed off had a fully reversible display, so you could carry it around as a tablet, or plop it on a desk and use it as a standard laptop. We've already seen some of the current breed of tablets, like the Transformer Prime, reach for the laptop world with its signature keyboard docking station, but it may hit a brick wall with full-fledge, equally-portable alternatives like these available. Another ultrabook had a slide mechanism  to show and hide the keyboard, which we've seen in smartphones, but not yet in tablets.

More →
1
loading...
0
loading...
20
loading...
0
loading...

In an interesting and somewhat unexpected decision, Intel has gone ahead and reportedly bought mobile-chip maker Infineon for $1.4 billion. Infineon makes mobile chips for all sorts of devices, including mobile phones. The latter business they got into after buying up LSI Corporation in 2007, with the Samsung Galaxy S series featuring their work.

The deal will let Intel use Infineon's mobile tech in "...Core processor-based laptops, and myriad of Intel Atom processor-based devices, including smartphones, netbooks, tablets and embedded computers". In addition, we can see Intel strengthening their "Wi-Fi and 4G WiMAX offerings".

All of this seems to set up Intel against Microsoft favorite Qualcomm, who's all-in-1 chipset solution seems to be very tempting for OEMs. The move, according to FastCompany, is due in part to off-set Apple's recent push in the mobile space with their A4 CPU which was developed in-house. Basically Intel is losing out in the mobile phone/slate area and is looking to cozy up with Microsoft through this purchase.

Of course, all of this is sort of funny knowing that Intel sold off their mobile division only a few years ago to Marvel for $600 million--while not 100% the same business, certainly Marvel and Infineon overlap quite a bit.

Will Intel succeed in cracking the mobile market and dislodge Qualcomm? Anyone want to ask Nvidia?

[Read Fast Company/Bloomberg]

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

We have been talking about developing technologies for offering massive storage for mobile devices for 2 ½ years now in the "Flash or HDD? That's the Question thread".  Intel just announced a huge step in offering GBs for cell phones with their new Solid State Drive (SSD) that is smaller than penny and weighs less than a drop of water, according to their press release:  

The tiniest in the industry, the Intel® Z-P140 PATA SSD is designed for ultra-small mobile internet devices, digital entertainment and embedded applications and is part of the proposed Intel “Menlow” platform. The Intel Z-P140 PATA SSD comes in 2 Gigabyte (GB) and 4GB densities, extendable to 16GB.

According to the Intel Product Brief this little SSD can hold its own with Read Throughput at 40 Megabytes / sec and Write Throughput at 30 Megabytes / sec and is tested with a Mean Time Between Failures at 2,500,000 hours (which if you are curious is 104,167 days... which is just over 285 years... which leads to... how in the heck did they come up with that?).

Today we are begging phone manufacturers to include at least 128 mb in any given phone and we willingly fall to our knees in praise when they put 256 mb of memory / storage in a phone.  Could you imagine the reality of having somewhere between a 2 GB to 16 GB of internal memory / storage on a phone be commonplace? Because we here at WMExperts can (and do).

When is this really going to be a reality?  I am not sure.  The Intel Fact Sheet does not come out and say specifically, but it does alludes to the possibility that it will be released with their proposed Menlow platform, which will be released to manufacturers sometime during the first half of 2008. Though, again, it's not clear that that the Z-P140 PATA SSD will be included with this first generation release of the Intel Menlow platform. 

All of which means that 2009 is probably the most optimistic projection for inclusion in GSM phones.  For those of us on CDMA networks here in the states, well, we'll probably be waiting another year after that for the typical catch-up and personalization phase (assuming, of course, that our CDMA carrier is even around anymore!)

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...