iphone 4

The Russian mobile phone website Mobiltelefon.ru has published a fairly long video of the Lumia 920 in action. This follows the video published comparing the video image-stabilisation on both the Lumia 920 and Samsung Galaxy S3.

While we can't tell what's being said throughout, we are aware of the team being located in a "secret Nokia bunker" - this was of course a humorous jab at Microsoft for how reserved they're being of Windows Phone 8. 

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Apple has announced the iPhone 4S today at the Let's Talk iPhone event with Tim Cook at the helm. So, what's new with the iPhone 4S? Is it a game changer or simply a fill in for the iPhone 5? For a start I'm afraid we do have a killer app here. Unfortunately it's not currently available for Windows Phone (or any other platform) - Cards. Yes, you read correctly. Cards. More on this in a minute.

Comparatively, what has Microsoft and the WP team achieved in the past month? Mango (with 500 features), as well as new handsets announced from Samsung, HTC, Nokia to name just a few. How does the iPhone 4S measure up?  Read on past the break and see what's in store for the iPhone crowd and judge for yourself. 

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As some of you may have heard, Apple held a press conference today in an attempt to get ahead of the ongoing 'antennagate' controversy surrounding the iPhone 4 (see TiPB's ongoing coverage here). Basically once Consumer Reports did their story, all heck broke loose and the usual Apple-friendly media turned a bit on Cupertino.

Although the iPhone has a clear, demonstrable antenna reception issue when held a certain way, Apple went ahead and tried to downplay the controversial design by pointing out that their competitors often suffer from the same reduced-bar problem.

Here, Steve Jobs cites the Samsung Omnia 2 on Verizon (see our full review) as having the same reception/grip issue. While not exactly the poster board Windows Mobile phone (that would easily be the Touch Pro 2 and HD2), the Omnia 2 is a decent piece of hardware, despite being pretty much forgotten by most of the world, including the WM community.

Any validity to Jobs' claim? A cursory search of various forums and sites would suggest that the Omnia 2 (both on GSM and Verizon's CDMA) is not the best of the world, but neither is it the worst. In fact, it doesn't come up even as a recurring problem or complaint. Having said that, we did find this video of the Omnia HD (i8910), which basically demonstrates the same phenomenon, lending credence to the claim by Jobs.

Bottom line: Windows Mobile and Windows Phone may suffer from such occasional hardware inconsistencies (CDMA Palm Treo Pro is just awful for reception, see this doozy of a fix), but having multiple devices for consumers to choose from, instead of just one-flagship phone, gives consumers options. If you're going to put all of your eggs into one basket, you better make sure that basket is 100% perfect or nearly so. Kudos to Apple for giving away those free cases, but we think that this problem should have never had happened in the first place. 

See Omnia HD i8910 reception video after the break.

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iPhone 4 Day schadenfreude

While we don't normally like to throw stones, especially at the competition which pretty much decimated our OS marketshare, who can resist pointing out some of the problems with the new iPhone 4? Sure, when mass-launching such a complicated device, issues are bound to pop up and no doubt 'quality control' is a tough thing--heck Microsoft lost a billion dollars on the Xbox RROD. Holla.

But here are the major ones for the iPhone 4, most of which can be expounded upon by our sister site TiPB.com:

  1. Reception: holding the phone in the wrong way absolutely kills voice/data reception, see video above and this Gizmodo post
  2. Yellow splotches on the screen, which may be temporary
  3. So-call Gorilla Glass is not so tough after all

Will Microsoft and its partners have the similar issues when launching this fall? Lets hope not.

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Recently at TechEd 10, Brandon Watson and Peter Torr discussed Windows Phone 7 development on Channel 9. You can watch the whole thing here, though suffice to say it's not the most exciting video nor does it shed too much more new info.

However, it was noted by Mobility Digest that there won't be any Gyroscope support for WP7, at least not right now. The new iPhone 4 has an electronic gyroscope which is supposed to be more sensitive than just an accelerometer. When combined, it should give the phone a more stable and accurate portrayal of its location in three dimensions. Why would that be important? For the growing area of "augmented reality" programs. Sure the accelerometer will help there too, but the gyroscope is even better.

In Microsoft's defense, we can see this as not being a top priority, so we'll allow this one to slide for future updates.

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Gee, that new iPhone 4 sure is shiny, with its high-resolution, 326-dpi screen. But you know what? It's not the first to cross the 300-dpi threshold. That news comes from from an Android guru, actually. Tim Bray, who joined Google earlier this year and knows a thing or three about this business broke it down today on his blog. The Windows Mobile-powered Toshiba G900 and the Sony Ericsson Xperia X1 (remember them, folks?) both packed in the pixels back in their day. Of course, neither was a big hit in the United States, so we'll forgive you for not counting their pixels. Check out the whole hubub over dots per inch at Tim's blog. [TimBray.org]

Edit: Getting a high DPI is easy when you double the resolution but *don't* increase the size of the screen, which is what Apple did with the iPhone 4. Fact is, 3.5inch for the iPhone is on the small side these days for smartphones as HTC has made 3.2"  small, 3.6" the medium and 4.3" as large. 

Had Apple made a 4.3" screen to compete with the HD2, their DPI would drop to a less impressive 268

Incidently, the AT&T Pure is about 291 DPI, which while lower than the iPhone 4, is still in the ball park despite having a lower resolution. Why? It only has a small 3.2" screen. The Xperia X1 was over 300 DPI because it only had a 3 inch screen.

While a high DPI is nice, having a larger screen can be just as preferable, especially for reading on-the-go.

--Malatesta

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