Nielsen

The overwhelming majority of Lumia 900 users are loving their phone

We know from personal experience that owners of the Lumia 900 (review) have a lot of pride in their device and that feeling has now been quantified in a new study commissioned by Nokia. Nokia hired Nielsen’s back in April to survey US buyers of their flagship Windows Phone to see how happy they were with their purchase decision. The numbers speak for themselves:

  • 96 per cent of owners are extremely satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their Lumia 900
  • 95 per cent of owners are willing to recommend the Lumia 900
  • 83 per cent say that their expectations are better or much better than expected
  • 85 per cent say they would repurchase the Lumia 900
  • 91 per cent think their phone is better than other mobiles out on the market
  • 95 per cent thought downloading an app from the Marketplace was easy to do

The survey was the online one we reported back in May and consisted of 810 people averaging 18 minutes to complete the questionnaire. Of course we wonder now how many of you skewed the results lending a sampling bias to Nielsen by not necessarily representing the average consumer (as opposed to “enthusiasts”). Ahem.

Results from the Nokia-Nielsen study (April 27, 2012 and on May 18, 2012)

Interestingly, nearly two-thirds of the people sampled had purchased their Lumia 900 through AT&T in a store as opposed to an online dealer like Amazon Wireless. We don’t have any numbers for comparison but it’s clear that in-store purchases are still king even when heavy-discounts are offered online (Amazon Wireless is routinely cheaper than AT&T direct).

Having said all of that we don’t doubt that many Lumia 900 users, either average or enthusiast, are very happy with their purchase. Nokia tends to garner brand loyalty and we’ve already seen how “Lumia” trends higher than “Windows Phone” reinforcing that notion. Today’s results are just as impressive.

Source: Nokia Conversations/Nielsen

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Own a Lumia 900 and have a spare 15 minutes? Why not fill out a Nielsen web survey for Lumia 900 Windows Phone customers, which could pocket you a $200 Amazon gift card. The 4G Windows Phone has been taking the states by storm, surpassing all expectations and selling faster than Nokia could produce which led to a number of delays, not just within the U.S. but around the world too.

Have you been happy with your Nokia Windows Phone, or have all the problems taken their toll? Be sure to check the survey out, but note that Facebook connectivity is required.

Source: Nielsen (Lumia 900 survey), via: @TheRomit; thanks @aharpaz for the heads up!

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Nielsen has announced that half of all mobile subscribers in the U.S. now own a smartphone. Comparing February 2012, where the lines for both feature phones and smartphones meet in the above graph, with February last year we can clearly see a massive jump from just 38%. That's an average increase of smartphone owners by 1% per-month.

With low-end, affordable Android and Windows Phones, consumers are now able to hop onto the smartphone train without breaking the bank balance. As technology continuously evolves and social networking becomes more prominent in our lives, more mobile phone owners are looking at ways to stay in touch with friends and family that doesn't require either texting or calling.

"More than two-thirds of those who acquired a new mobile device in the last three months chose a smartphone over a feature phone."

According to Nielsen's marketshare data (for the U.S.), Android still runs the show with a 48% hold of the market. iOS is at a comfortable 32%, RIM struggles on with 12%, and Windows Phone is lost somewhere among the "other" 8%. While many could look at this negatively, this data is prior to Nokia and AT&T's upcoming marketing blitz for the Lumia 900, which is set to available on April 8th.

With the steady rate of consumers acquiring smartphones, now is the time for Nokia to push through the Lumia family of handsets to capture the market, and Microsoft needs to be behind them throwing surplus dosh away at every opportunity.

Via: BGR

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As you can see in the illustration above, Android and iOS has seen growth (3% and 2% respectively) since the previous report, which we covered in late May. In that Q1 report we saw Android taking 36% of the US market, while iOS was on 26% and RIM in third place at 23%. This quarter RIM has lost 3%, plummeting to just 20% of the market.

What's interesting for us Windows Phone users is that while Microsoft has lost a single percentage overall (counting both WinMob and WP7) dropping from 10% to 9%, we're not sure where the split is between the two. In the previous report WinMob was at 9% with WP7 only on 1%, but Nielsen has failed to separate the two platforms this time around. WP7 could be seeing positive growth and hitting 2% while WinMob falls to 7%. We just don't know.

What do you guys think, do you believe that Nyan Cat can sway some people?

Source: Nielsen

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Looks like all is not doom and gloom with Windows Phone 7. While there have been plenty of surveys noting that the OS is not catching on as fast, Microsoft has always taken the position that this is a marathon, not a race and that eventually the OS will break through.

According to a new Nielsen survey, Microsoft's mobile OS's (Windows Phone 7, Windows Mobile) command 10% of the market share. This is actually quite a jump, if accurate, from the oft-cited 6% number that we've seen in other surveys. The survey looks at the last three months of data and has Android at 29% and Apple, RIM tied at 27%. Unfortunately we don't know the exact breakdown between Mobile/Phone 7, but we shudder to think that WM has made a comeback of late and that WP7 is more than 2%, as the NPD survey shows.

Getting back to Windows, Ross Rubin, executive director of industry analysis for NPD, had nothing but positive things to say. According to Sci-Tech Today, he praised Windows Phone 7's differentiation and product integration but suggested they still need to "...close the feature gap, offer more exclusive capabilities, work with partners to deliver hardware with better differentiation, and leverage its extensive experience in driving developer communities to increase its app offerings." Meanwhile, Al Hilwa, director of applications development software at IDC lauded Microsoft's Marketplace both in terms of app buildup and quality of apps, suggesting it is one of the most successful launches to date. He also mentioned how we won't see the full power of Microsoft till the next version of Windows, which seeks full integration across product lines:

Most importantly, the full weight of the ecosystem will probably not come to bear on this until Windows PCs themselves are brought into alignment with this when Windows for ARM ships, and some viable Microsoft-based tablets are in the market.

That we agree with too, even if it is nearly 2 years out. Regardless, it's nice to see both that 10% number and various industry analysts bullish on Windows Phone 7 and Microsoft's plans.

Source: Nielsen, NPD, IDC; via Sci-Tech Today

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Nielsen's has some interesting stats just released regarding mobile OS trends, specifically the average number of applications users have installed on their phones.

Broken down by OS, we see Windows Mobile near dead last, just edging out BlackBerry but far behind the iPhone and Android. Not too shocking but it does exemplify the dire straights Microsoft is in when it comes to the mobile world--we just edge out feature phones!

Average number of apps: Smartphone: 22, Feature phone: 10

  • BlackBerry: 10
  • iPhone:37
  • Android: 22
  • Palm: 14
  • Windows Mobile: 13

Also worth noting is that 21% of the cell phone market is now smartphones, up from that 14% cited so often from 2008. Microsoft, time to update your slide again.

What's your number?  Take the poll!

 

How many apps do you have?online surveys
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