Power

While PC users might be familiar with their machines under-clocking themselves to save energy, reduce heat, and prevent damage, the idea is new for Microsoft’s Xbox console. According to an interview Gizmodo had with Xbox’s General Manager of Console Development, Leo Del Castillo, the new Xbox One will be able to cool itself down in a multitude of ways, including "dialing it back to a lower power state."

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To help with the on going battle to monitor your Windows Phone 8 battery performance, enter the Windows Phone 8 app myBattery.

myBattery will chart your batteries life cycle, note the percentage of power left and an estimated time left on the current charge. Live tile support includes the multiple sized tiles with the medium and small tile showing just the percentage left and the large tile showing both the percentage and time remaining.

Additional features include customizable colors for the battery meter and chart, charts cover not only daily use but overall use history and notifications in the lockscreen.

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When the Nokia Lumia 920 specifications hit last month, the rather large battery (2000mAh) was touted as one of the main features, resulting in supposed “all day use”. That’s especially important for consumers on such a powerhouse of a phone since it has all of those bells and whistles on board.

The AT&T version has recently been posted on Nokia’s site and it has some updated specifications from the global version, including some new battery times. The bad news is they have been slightly marked down for the massive 4G network, most likely due to some carrier requirements resulting in some firmware changes in addition to that super fast LTE network.

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Venture Beat has put out their list of "Top Mobile Movers for 2012" defined by them as "The kind of people who thrive in this world are disruptive individuals. Troublemakers. Shakers-up of the status quo" and perhaps not so surprisingly two folks from Microsoft and Nokia are named on the top-ten list.

First up is someone we haven't mentioned much around here, Mary T. McDowell, Vice President, Nokia. While Elop gets a lot of praise and the spotlight (he's does have great stage presence), McDowell is busy behind the scenes concentrating on the mobile phone business aka the Asha S40 line as opposed to the more attention-getting smartphone business. Although she plays little role within Windows Phone, Nokia's future strategy seems to eventually merge the mobile phone (aka "dumb phone") business with the smartphone one. After all, if an Asha phone can be cheap and run S40, why can't it run Windows Phone?

Next up is someone you should at least heard of: Terry Myerson. He took over as corporate vice president of Windows Phone division back in December when Andy Lees was reassigned by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. Although he doesn't have the title of President of the Windows Phone division, he still oversees every aspect of the platform and where it's going. Venture Beat credits Myerson's "no-nonsense" approach for having reset Microsoft's mobile strategy a few years back i.e. when Microsoft threw out Windows Mobile 7 "Photon" and instead went with the more risky Windows Phone 7 OS.

Venture Beat goes on to note that "Windows Phone is early in its lifecycle, but it’s an attractive, responsive operating system that’s getting a lot of notice. You can count on it to make big waves in the mobile market this year." Indeed and Microsoft (and Nokia) seem to have the right people on board.

Source: Venture Beat; Power Man image via Shutterstock

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Abhinav Pathak, a computer scientist at Purdue University, Indiana, and colleagues have concluded that free smartphone apps with in-app advertising may lead to the battery being drained at a faster rate, compared to paid apps. What's interesting (and slightly alarming) is the team discovered through testing that Angry Birds, Free Chess and NYTimes only used 10 - 30 percent of the battery power for core functionality.

Using the Android Market as the test grounds for the research, the team found that 25 - 35% of the app power consumption went to third-party advertising code displayed in apps for developers to make ends meet. In the case of Angry Birds, 20% is used to display and run the game, while 45% of the power is used finding and uploading the user's location with GPS, followed by downloading location-appropriate ads over a 3G connection.

This is something to consider when next browisng any smartphone marketplace. The findings will be presented by Pathak at the EuroSys conference in Bern, Switzerland, next month. Be sure to check out the full research documentation as it's fairly lengthy, but interesting.

Source: Microsoft Research, via: NewScientist

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If you're like us, we're getting ready for that big ol' hurricane Irene (we're in Manhattan now, Long Island tomorrow--yikes). Since we're pretty positive we're going to lose electricity for some amount of time, even up to days, getting all the power out of our Windows Phone is key.

One easy method "Mango" users can enable now is the Battery Saver feature by going to Settings --> Battery Saver --> "Turn on Battery Saver now, until my next charge". The phone will of course still work, but background services and push email will be disabled--which is a great way to squeeze out a few more hours from your phone while you pray for the lights to come back on.

It also wouldn't hurt to bump your backlight to "Low" under Settings as well. Good luck everyone.

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Review: Griffin PowerDuo Universal

If you are a regular reader of this site, chances are you are both a Windows Mobile power user and a gadget fiend. If you fall under either of those categories, the conundrum of keeping your devices charged while still having the convenience of a portable device can be a hassle. More often than not, our device comes with a single charging solution for use at work or home.

Enter Griffin’s PowerDuo Universal charging solution. Griffin gives you the best of both worlds, offering a single solution that gives you a generic power source (through a USB port) in both a 12v car charger (AKA PowerJolt) and 15 amp charger for home or office use (dubbed PowerBlock). Both the PowerJolt and PowerBlock come in this single package for $31.95.

(This will even work with non-Windows Mobile devices, like Phil and Mal’s favorite, the ZuneHD; hence the use of the word “Universal”.)

For more pictures, and the full review, hit the break.

 

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