sample

189

Nokia Lumia 1020: Photo samples

While the Nokia Lumia 1020 for AT&T is a stellar Windows Phone for checking your emails, posting to Twitter or listening to music, that’s not why you want to buy one, right? Nope, it’s for those 41MP images (and oversampled smaller ones).

As a preview to our review, here are some sample photos that we took today. The images posted here are the smaller 5MP photos with Nokia’s oversampling i.e. these are the ones you would share. They’re also resized to fit your computer display.

Fear not pixel peepers as we have the originals, in their full HD glory, right here for downloading (via SkyDrive). Warning though, it’s an 85 MB ZIP file.

More →
12
loading...
86
loading...
66
loading...
0
loading...

File this under fun.

During the production phase of the Nokia Lumia 920, the hardworking folks who put together these remarkable devices quickly test out the camera, checking for colors and whether or not it even works. Sometimes though, they forget to delete the samples. Such is the case with Ryan J.'s phone, which still had a few photos and even a video clip on board.

Head past the break and catch a quick glimpse at the people behind your new toy.

More →
0
loading...
11
loading...
21
loading...
0
loading...

We told you that you have to get used to seeing these side-by-side videos of the Nokia Lumia 920’s video camera in action. That’s because optical image stabilization in a smartphone is kind of a big deal for camera technology—it’s really a big step forward and one of the first real innovations since BSI hit the scene.

The video above, hailing from Russia we presume, shows the Lumia 920 mounted to the inside windshield of a car as it drives over train tracks and some bumpy terrain. It’s compared to…well, we’re not sure, as our Cyrillic translator is a bit off today. But the point should be clear that when OIS is used for video, it actually makes a huge difference in terms of quality. Needless to say, we can’t wait to try it.

Source: YouTube; via Reddit

More →
1
loading...
37
loading...
42
loading...
0
loading...

First off, congratulations to Nokia’s Chanse Arrington who’s Head of Developer & Content Marketing at the company. He was just married and while the addition of a wife to his life must be fulfilling, we’re focused on that Lumia 920.

The picture above is taken with the 920 as posted to his public SkyDrive account (he Tweeted the image yesterday). The picture is obviously very low light though a flash is used this case to brighten the scene.

Flash photography is a finicky subject. A lot of us shoot “natural”, which means big heavy lenses and only on available light. But sometimes you have to use a flash for certain situations. One thing though pros never do is use the “on board” flash—it’s like sacrilege. That’s why they always have giant flash contraptions with diffusers and such to give a much better photo.

More →
2
loading...
3
loading...
29
loading...
0
loading...

HTC testing the FF camera on the 8X

When we had our hands on with the HTC 8X a few weeks ago, we were able to test the camera and noted at the time that it was extremely quick (due to the dedicated image chip). Since then, some sample images of the rear 8MP shooter have come forth and they look really good for a modern smartphone.

Over on the official HTC Blog, they posted an interview with HTC product planner Anthony Rutter focusing on the HTC 8X and 8S. While most of the info in the interview is quite basic for our readers e.g. the new Live Tile system in Windows Phone 8, they did post a single image of the front-facing camera.

More →
1
loading...
8
loading...
31
loading...
0
loading...

The 8X features a solid 8MP shooter

Although we’re convinced that the Nokia Lumia 920’s camera sets the bar for “high end” these days, HTC is no slouch either and their Windows Phone 8X has some nifty specs going for it as well.

The 8X’s camera features an impressive F/2.0 aperture at a cozy 28mm and 8MP. It also sports a backside illuminated  (BSI) sensor and a dedicated image-chip for fast processing and some advanced photo processing.

The result? It’s a darn good camera.

More →
14
loading...
537
loading...
110
loading...
0
loading...

As you may have noticed, the new HTC 8X for Windows Phone 8 features a nice little hardware amplifier (2.55v) to boost audio output.

We got to sample it today in New York and you’ll see as I try to narrate over the audio, I simply cannot compete. While it’s hard to get the “real feel” via video, from our limited experience we can say it does indeed make a difference. Audio is noticeably louder and just as sharp without distortion. Running a line-out to some speakers or other media device should ensure some pumping tunes, perfect for the media-savvy consumer out there.

While boosted audio is not everyone’s selling point for a new phone, we can certainly see many folks considering this the icing on the cake for the stellar looking 8X.

More →
18
loading...
392
loading...
113
loading...
0
loading...

Howdy folks, as we get ready to leave CES 2012 in Vegas, we still have a few more nuggets for you. In the above video, you'll see three samples from the 16MP TITAN II camera from HTC. Shot in 720P and testing two of the filters, we were pretty happy with the results, but we'll let you decide.

Of course, this is unfinished software/hardware so there may be slight changes and optimizations before the phone is released, so don't consider this the final test of the TITAN II. We really like HTC's custom filters of which there we many to choose from (we show just two in the video).

One curious thing we found out: the TITAN II has a dedicated processor for the camera, which is why shooting a 16MP pic feels just as fast as shooting an 8MP on the original TITAN. That's some pretty cool tech, if you ask us. Make sure to also check out our 16MP photo samples from the TITIAN II right here!

More →
0
loading...
2
loading...
26
loading...
0
loading...

So did you hear? The HTC TTTAN II features a massive 16MP camera--one of the highest we've heard of on a mobile phone. We're still pretty blown away by it. HTC doubled the "old" TITAN's 8MP camera in less than six months.

Now yes, megapixels aren't everything, in fact compared to the sensor and lens, megapixels are near the bottom. Still, for cropping and detail (resolution), we'll take a 16MP on our phone, thank you.

Our favorite thing about this feature on the TITAN II is that there's no difference in performance: they process just as fast and the camera just hums along like it was shooting at 8MP. No lag whatsoever, which we're very happy about.

How's the over all quality? Hard to say as we only had a few moments on a very, very bright day. Above are a couple of samples resized for our site. But we'll do you a solid and provide the untouched originals for you to download. That way you can tinker around. Cool? Only the best for you guys...!

Links after the break...

More →
0
loading...
0
loading...
22
loading...
0
loading...

For those curious, the world-wide attempt by Microsoft at updating Windows Phone to version 7.5 aka "Mango" seems to be hitting a steady pace of about 1.5% per day. Using the app 'I'm a WP7!' which has data sampled from a massive 83,527 users, we can see that Mango (builds 7720, 7721) is now on 20% of devices the world over (17% in the U.S.).

If you throw in the developer and beta builds of Mango, we're at nearly 30% of those 83,000 users, putting us up about 12% from a week ago.

While that official number of 20% may seem low, remember that Microsoft is doing a controlled update process, meaning only a small percentage of users will actually get an update notification. That number has increased this week, but we imagine it will still be another 10 days before we hit 50% of users on Mango. What we are seeing though is a consistent and steady daily increase in those upgrading to Windows Phone 7.5, much faster than any previous build.

Want some perspective via our competition? Android's latest version of the OS titled 'Gingerbread' (2.3x) was released in December of 2010. As of yesterday, they are hovering at about 38% devices world wide on that OS build--that's 10 months out. Microsoft, meanwhile, has managed to get 20% of its users on their latest version of the OS in 10 days. Clearly, we see who the real winner is here.

Edit: We should point out that it's not so much about numbers of users here that's the difference between Windows Phone and Android, but the model for update distribution is vastly different. Microsoft has taken a much more direct approach to ensure that those 10 devices on 50 carriers world wide were all on the same page at the same time. Scale matters, but the update model here is the key differentiating factor between the two platforms. If you threw in a million HD7s to the mix, it would change very little since that same update is still approved for a million phones. We're just saying, we're not the Samsung Infuse 4G.

Grab 'I'm a WP7!' for free here in the Marketplace to add your stats.

More →
4
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...