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34

webOS review - Smartphone Round Robin

Myriad metaphors come to mind when thinking about Palm and Microsoft. David and Goliath. A young upstart fighter who took a couple of punches, versus an aging but still powerful opponent. A young executive overtaking the old man in the corner office. Take your pick.

In the past year, Palm announced and delivered on a new (and some say revolutionary) operating system and a pair of new phones. Microsoft announced and delivered another iteration of its operating system, which has found itself on a number of new devices. Their stories parallel each other, though many say the companies and their platforms are traveling in opposite directions.

After the break, we go in-depth with Palm's webOS from a Windows Mobile perspective, Smartphone Round Robin-style.

One company exits the desert, another enters

First, a bit of background. It was just a few years ago. Palm's Garnet operating system, beloved by many, was aging. No successor was in sight. The OS side of Palm was sold off, an infamous gaffe in technology history. The Foleo, a netbook before netbooks were netbooks, was unceremoniously put down. The stock dropped, and dropped, and dropped.

Recognizing a new direction was needed, Palm circled the wagons and went dark. Months and months went by, and new investors came in. A couple new Palm OS Treos were released, as well as some decent Windows Mobile Treos. But that wasn't going to get the job done, and everyone knew it. In early 2009, webOS was announced. It was be based on the language of the Internet, and the Palm Pre, a river stone-shaped device with a flush touchscreen and vertically-sliding keyboard, would carry the flag.

Around the same time, Microsoft announced Windows Mobile 6.5, and not Windows Mobile 7, which had been long rumored but never seemed to get off the ground. WinMo 6.5, as it's commonly called, was build on its predecessor, Windows Mobile 6.1; which was build on its predecessor, Windows Mobile 6.0; which was built on its predecessor, Windows Mobile 5. And so on an so forth. Eyes rolled. Mouths yawned. A bit unfairly, but the sentiment was felt far and wide. This was not going to wow the masses. As of this writing, Windows Mobile 7 still has not been announced. And it may well be another year before it reaches consumers.

One company moves forward. The other, if not moving backward, certainly seems to be spinning its wheels.

webOS and Windows Mobile 6.5

Palm's new operating is devilishly simple. At its core is Linux, the open-sourced OS found in just about everything these days, it seems. But the key to webOS is that to develop for it, you need only know such tools as HTML and Javascript, the basic building blogs of the Web site design. If you can build a Web page, you can develop an app for webOS. It also means that webOS is easy to tailor to phones with different resolutions, like when a Web browser is resized. Windows Mobile, on the other hand, has a massive chart of all the screen permutations. It's daunting.

Graphically, webOS is striking and subtle at the same time. It's totally different than the previous Palm OS. But you can still feel that Palm was behind it. 

Being based on basic Web code is great, but really useful for most of us. Where webOS really shines is in app management. Windows Mobile users are used to wanting to exit applications. It's in our DNA. If an app's open and we don't need it? Close the sucker. Palm's made multitask effortless with its "cards" metaphor. Think of open applications -- actually more than just apps: anything at all you have running -- as playing cards. With a single touch you can show the deck, switch to a different card, or swipe up to toss it away, thus closing the app. That, and ease of development, truly are where webOS shines.

Ah, but there's an Achilles' heel. Because webOS is HTML-based, programmers can't do some of the deep-level coding that makes apps on other platforms so powerful and immersive. And webOS is still in its infancy, and programs don't have access to some of the core parts of the phone's database. It also still is not using any of the graphics power it has waiting under the hood. This is not to say webOS is lacking, but at the moment it is limited. We'd expect Palm to open things up at some point. It's just that they haven't yet.

Beyond the nuts and bolts, webOS is very intuitive. It will take a little learning, but it's far from intimidating. And once you understand the card metaphor and have the basic gesture inputs for bringing up menus and moving things around (and these are very simple inputs), you'll be dealing seconds just like the best in Vegas.

Hardware

Palm has two new phones. Windows Mobile 6.5, released in October, is on a good handful (and Windows Mobile 6 and 6.1 are on dozens of devices). For the Round Robin, we paired the Palm Pre (the first webOS device) and Pixi (newer and smaller) up against the HTC Touch Pro 2 and HTC HD2. At first we're inclined to declare this an unfair fight. The Pre and Pixi are dwarfed by their WinMo counterparts. (Hell, everything is dwarfed by the HD2 with its 4.3-inch screen.)

What we have are vastly different form factors. The Pre is a vertical slider, meaning the keyboard comes down from behind the touchscreen. Its processor is speedy, but the phone can get bogged down if too many programs are open.The Pixi has a front-facing keyboard, with you all the time. Both have capacitive touchscreens, which recognize touch inputs better than the resistive screen on the Touch Pro 2. The HD2 is just a hulking monster. Its humongous capacitive screen and 1GHz Snapdragon processor mean it's not lacking for size or speed.

The only real knock on the Pre and Pixi are when it comes to size. The Pre's 3.1-inch screen is usable, but needs a size increase. the Pixi is just tiny, and it's lacking in processing power. For a first-time smartphone user, that may be OK. But considering the Pre can be purchased for just a little more money ($50 more is the norm), it's really a no-brainer. But those things aside, the Pre and the Pixi really are better than the sum of their parts. They just feel good in the hand and fit the overall feel of the Palm and webOS experience.

The app experience

"Yeah, but does it have apps?" Does webOS have apps? Look, on Windows Mobile, we're used to tens of thousands of apps that can be loaded anytime, anyplace. Microsoft finally launched the Windows Marketplace for Mobile in October 2009, starting to bring things together (though by no means was it the first repository for Windows Mobile programs).

On webOS, at least at first, you were stuck with what Palm gave ya. But nerds will be nerds, the Pre quickly was hacked open to allow new and unofficial (as in not yet sanctioned by Palm) apps. "Homebrew" was born. Our own PreCentral.net is a major player in the Homebrew world, serving up (as of this writing) nearly 390 apps, which have been downloaded more than 4.6 million times. Homebrew is not a fad.

An app store is an app store is an app store. Apple might have done it first (and many would say best). But others quickly caught up, and the official Palm App Catalog sports more than 800 apps at the moment. The WinMo Marketplace sports 462, but that's a U.S.-only number and fluctuates in other nations. Both stores are easy to maneuver and are easy to download from. And, really, that's as important as the phone being used. Palm has a lot of momentum behind webOS. The trick will be maintaining it.

Availability

Like we said, Windows Mobile is available everywhere. On all major (and most other) U.S. carriers. In a variety of form factors. Horizontal slider? Got it. Hulking black slab? Sure. Want one with a kickstand and mobile TV? No problem. The sky's the limit. The Palm Pre and Pixi? Currently only available on Sprint, with which Palm has had a special relationship for some time. But Palm needs growth. It needs to get as many phones into the market as it can right now. And there are countless consumers waiting to buy, once Palm comes to them. That's a big bag of hurt right now.

Oh, and by the way, webOS killed off the Windows Mobile Treo. We're still smarting over that one.

Usability and the wrap-up

I like to say that if you can use Windows Mobile -- as in really use it -- you can use any other mobile OS out there. And that rings true for Palm's webOS. App management is a breeze. The Web browser is top-shelf. For e-mail, Palm has Synergy, which can cull contacts from a number of sources -- Exchange accounts, gmail, Facebook, etc. Multimedia? Yeppers. Chances are if you need to do something, there's, ahem, an app for that.

Could I live with webOS for a week? Absolutely. A month? Sure. Really all it's missing right now is a bigger audience, and that should change in the coming months. Verizon is the likely suspect, but AT&T and T-Mobile are possible contenders, too.

Palm has been known as the kinder, gentler platform, and that remains true today. Your family can use it. Your friends can use it. Windows Mobile 6.5 is less utilitarian than its predecessor, and we're looking at it to become even more friendly with Windows Mobile 7 in 2010. That could well give Palm a run for its money in the consumer space. As for Palm in 2010? It has to get more hands on its phones. And while the Pre is only six months old, attention spans are short in the mobile world. As Palm's meager empire expands once more, it's going to need new hardware to go with it. Certainly there's already something in the works.

Palm has all of the pieces on the board in front of it. And it's calculating and executing moves months ahead. Microsoft has pulled back and is shuffling its deck once more. Finally it realized that what it was putting out wasn't competitive (despite its following). Can a company the size of Microsoft stop what it's doing, retreat to Redmond, Wash., and start anew, like Palm did with webOS, the Pixi and the Pre? Perhaps. But Palm finished its time in the desert much sooner than Microsoft began its trek. What will Palm bring in 2010? And will Microsoft be able to meet it, in mind share as well as future market share?

News at 11.

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Comments

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JackG058 says:

I wanted to like the Pre, having owned the Treo 700p, Centro, and then the Treo 800w. I like Palm, and I think their products have been great overall. However, while I loved webOS in my month long trial with the Pre last summer, the device itself just felt cheaply made. I honestly began to worry whether it would last the course of a two year commitment. Couple with that the fact that I got a poor signal with my Pre which would suck the battery life away (tried exchanging for a different Pre and still had poor reception) and I sadly ended up returning mine. I'm now on the HTC TP2, who's build quality is just stellar. When I pick up my TP2, I feel the quality. I feel like this thing would last years if taken care of. When I pay hundreds for a cell phone, that's the feeling I want to have. In my opinion, Palm should have built the Pre with sturdier construction, and they might find that they sold ever more.

says:

I am agreeing with the first guy. I bought the palm pre when it first came out and I watched it's every move since first hearing about it in January of 09. I was very excited and anticipating the launch. I did like the phone and I think it has great potential but its not ready yet for business users. I rely heavily on my calendar, contacts, tasks, memo and palm pre just doesnt rise the the challenge as phones such as blackberry. I believe that when os 2.0 comes around things will be different and until then im waiting in the background cheering palm on because I do want them to suceed.

says:

i own a pre, have had it for 3months now, and all i can say is that i love how useful multitasking is! all my friends love my phone, cuz of how fast it is, and the network of course. i used to own a treo pro, and my ex had an htc pro. and i love WINMO. but i think that webOS is just faster and more efficient.

the whole battery issue, was fixed in an update about 2months ago, and also, u can make setting changes to make the battery last longer.

and yes, there are a lot of apps. not that many. but its growing. specially the homebrew ones. i personally use preware rather than the app catalog, bcuz as soon as u start seeing all the apps, everything u see is like, I WANT THAT! all of these apps are things that you really need, not some joke apps.

brat1475 says:

I like what I see with WebOS. The hold ups for me is Sprint as the only carrier and screen size. Bring a Web OS device to TMobile with at least a 3.5" capacitive touchscreen and I am sold.

says:

T-Mobile???? Really??? Why even consider T-mobile as a viable launch partner considering their network just went 3g and on top of that is very limited. When looking at smart phones you should compare data coverage by the carrier. Sure voice is important but the key to smart phones is the data side and all you can use that for. So in saying that if you really want to compare networks with a little common sense Verizon has the largest coverage area followed by Sprint followed by ATT then waaaayyyy in the distance playing catch up is T-mobile. Sure ATT's network may report faster service by independent reporting agencies but is that really going to help if it is so limited? On top of that if you want to throw pricing in to the mix along with coverage Then honestly the best bang for your buck is Sprint. Yeah, T-mobile may be the cheapest, but so are Kias. Are you going to say those are comparable to the likes or Mustangs and Corvettes? In closing Web-OS is a great system that works very well for many users. I myself am not a huge fan of WINMO however Win 7 looks to be promising after hearing they have greatly revamped the interface. However just like every WINMO operating system they claim it to have fixed all of the previous issues and it usually does however new ones always arise. I have carried my pre since May of 09(I got a pre-release of the phone) and honestly have not had any issues with the phone itself, it moves along smoothly and quickly. My first phone was actually even a beta version, it didnt even have the final software on it and it worked fine. Palm made a solid choice to go with Sprint. The network can actually support the functions of the phone, much like android. Once android started hitting other carriers the phones seemed much better, why? Because the network actually fuels the phone instead of slowing it down. i hope the best for WINMO 7 and Web-OS because both are very usefule tools in todays modern age.

says:

Qwerty slide down keyboard...virtual keyboard. What's the issue? My pre works great! Fantastic coverage. Ton of apps. The Pre is very easy to use.

cafe_civet says:

Would have liked more feedback on the keyboard as that has always been an issue for me with Palm devices

says:

I have a palm pre and on my 4th one in 2 months. they have sent 2 program updates since then and each time they add new features but destroy another one. the battery life sucks worst than the iphone battery, no matter what u change to save battery life. It shuts off, freezes, misses calls. The worst is that i lost my contacts when i exchanged my phone because their palm profile didn't save them. It has tons of great software and apps and if not for the crapy phone under palm would be amazing, so now getting at touch pro 2 to see how that handles. I must say. i love the copy and paste on the pre. easy to post things from emails or websites to my social networks.

says:

That annoying problem was actually solved and covered in depth on this and other sites recently. What happens is that your replacement Pre usually doesn't have the most current version of the OS installed. You have to create a fake profile when you first activate the replacement and then immediately update to the latest firmware version. You then log in with your real Palm profile and it will restore your backed up profile. If you DON'T do it that way, the replacement phone will overwrite your backup with your new, blank phone data. Oddly for me, my automatic backups don't take place anymore. Even though I have it turned on, I still have to manually back up. Stopped working sometime back in September.

My feelings echo those of most others here. I'm very impressed with WebOS, less so with the Pre (although the screen size IS pretty impressive for a device this compact with a concealed keyboard). I've always used Treos, and have been with Sprint for 10yrs Very pleased with the service, coverage, and price. I think a more durable, "expensive feeling" device and a modestly larger form factor would be a nice direction to head in. The continued updates also seem to be the most frequent in the industry.

says:

I've had my pre since launch. It was replaced once(my own stupidity for droping on concrete.) I have not had any of the problems previously mentioned. The battery was the only issue and with updates my phone went from lasting 4-6 hours at launch to holding a charge up to 2 days. The carrier really does make a huge difference, and since Sprint seems to offer the best mix of price vs. speed, I'm very happy with the carrier. I also still have active my old Treo 750 on ATT, and I'm a huge winmo fan because of alot of the syncing and business side of things, but very buggy and laggy. Overall I think the WebOS wins for me as an OS, but can't wait to see what microsoft has up their sleeve for Winmo7. If it follows in it's big brother's footsteps(Windows7) then we ought to really have something. Cause I gotta tell ya, before windows 7 I used windows as little as humanly possible in lieu of Ubuntu Linux. I am very sad though that Palm dropped Winmo as an alternative device, because to me Palm was the only one I would have bought a Winmo phone from. On that same note, glad to see HTC doesn't suck and freeze every time u pick it up anymore!

devonair says:

@cafe_civet if you've had a problem with previous Palm keyboards (like most Treos) than you will have a problem with the Pre's. Personally, I can fly on my Pre's keyboard. But then again, I've used EVERY Sprint Treo there was. I'm used to the small keys and narrow form factor. In fact, I prefer it over landscape keyboards (again, probably because I'm used to it). It did take me some adjusting, though, and I do miss the 'clicker' feel and bigger size of previous Treo keyboards. However, I'm guessing you would hate it...

says:

I own a Palm Pre.
First, I love Sprint. I hope they keep releasing the better WebOS phones on Sprint. It has low prices, good coverage, fast 3g... what else do you want?

Overall, I want WebOS to emerge from the depths. It should sooner or later, but I think the hardware is meh. I would love a larger screen and if Palm is to release video recording, GPU access, flash, etc... Palm should be doing better than fine.

says:

I agree with the post before me. I love My Pre or more precisly I love Webos, I think that palm needs to hurry up and catch up by adding such functions ad video recording, and Gpu acess, also Flash is on the way, that will put them ahead of many other smartphones that cannot use flash. I want to see WebOS on a Bigger Screen. Can you Imagine WebOS on the HTC HD2 with full GPU access and the hardware of the HD2, Man that would kill the Iphone any day.

says:

After my last post i went back to the top of this page and viewed the picture of the pre by the HD2. My mouth started to water as i notice the ecceptional screen Difference. Palm Gave WebOS a bigger Screen!!!! Trust me you OS is that good!!!!

says:

I think the Palm Pre would make a good first smartphone in the consumer space. If I had to choose between the Pre or the TouchPro 2 I would go for the TouchPro 2 even though I love the way Web OS multitasks. I have a colleague at work who isn't a smartphone poweruser. She uses her Pre for email, and listening to Pandora. I don't even think she knew that her Pre (in the beginning) was able to sync with iTunes. Pre should go after this market segment with a fury on all the carriers, and behind the scenes court developers, build up its app store, and work on the hardware. I don't want Web OS or Palm to go away. Although I personally wouldn't choose it, I want Palm to succeed.

says:

I dream the Pre
i wish the Pre
i hope the Pre
i want the Pre
i almost got on Pre...

But the the Pre never came and i got tired of waiting :(

Even if i m a long time fan and user of Palm"pilot" and even if i d love my Treo Pro, Palm doesn t seem to be interested in the european market, to bad, i know a lot of people wishing to see Palm revival.

And as i can t read here or ome place else, this company have a very strong sympathy feeling toward their owner, it is a shame they seems to forget about that, people get tired once and technology keep growing...so there it is, bye bye Palm, i don t live in the us nor in the Uk so Welcome HTC HD2 and so long, i had a wonderful time with you and your Hotsync ring but now i found a new lover, more dedicaded, more charming :'( ... ^..^

And very good post by the way !

says:

I switched from Windows Mobile to the Palm Pre. Amazing that WebOS elegantly handles multiple Exchange accounts while Windows own operating system doesn't - a feature I had been needing for a long time. I always defended WinMo over the other platforms, but I think Palm really got it right and with some more time, WebOS will continue to mature and become more powerful.

says:

I love my pre, I have had mine for over 3 months now and it is great. Yes it has it's quirks but the advatages I feel far out weigh the negatives. With the addition of the hombrew scene with patching, themes, and unofficial apps this phone is fantastic. BTW I love sprint, very reasonable plans, solid 3G network, and unlimited roaming on version, can't beat that. Also I have to say that the hardware issues I hear about with the pre are almost exclusivly with the first run of phones and the refurbs of those devices which I have witnessed their poor quality but all those that I have seen purchased from the time I got mine are solid.

says:

I've owned the Pre since August, and I love it. Even though it feels cheaply made, I haven't had any problems with the hardware, despite dropping it on the floor dozens of times. My 18 month old son even gets his hands on it, and there has never been a problem. This phone is still in its infancy. Not many people remember how big of a let down the first iphone was, which is why there have been multiple versions released. Give the Pre some time and it will get better and better

says:

WebOS is awesome - I am a new developer to the platform and loving every minute of it!

says:

I got the Pre the day it was released. True the phone is not the quality build of the older Treo and the key board could be improved. Still, it is an amazing device on fastest and cheapest data plan network in the States. Palm OS is a very innovative platform and is evloving on a daily basis with updates to the phone and new apps. The multitasking functions and synergy synchronization with multiple mail applications and calendars simply rocks! There are many cool smartphones out there but Pre is definitely worth serious consideration.

says:

Good review. I have now owned my Pre for 2 months and love it. Before my Pre I had a TP2 for a week and returned it to sprint. WebOS is consistent, fluid (for the most part, though it can get laggy sometimes), and has excellent web and email. My experience with a non-cooked TP2 was that it was a phone with 2 totally different UIs that never knew which to run. If I got a text, for example, and opened it directly from the notification, it would show the pretty TF3D messaging app. If I opened the message another way, it would go to the standard WinMo messaging app. And it was so frustrating never knowing for sure how my TP2 was going to look and function.

says:

I switched from Windows Mobile to the Palm Pre and have never looked back. WM does a good job with exchange and that's about it. Even with WM having EAS native to the OS I still always had problems with duplicated data and other issues.

The Palm Pre can handle multiple exchange accounts and still allows you to use multiple Google Calendar, contacts and Gmail accounts. It syncs perfectly and never duplicates data or causes other issues. To me that feature just can not be beat!

joecatskill says:

Would love to see Palm upgrade the hardware on Pre and come out on Verizon.

rijc99 says:

I tried the Palm Pre when it first came out but after two bad phones, I gave up. In the time I had it I got so used to the interface I found myself swiping my iPhone's screen for a couple of weeks after I went back.

I'm waiting for Palm to release a 3.5 inch plus web os tablet style phone. I'm finding myself less and less in the physical keyboard camp.

Basically take a Touch HD, and put web os on it and I'll consider it. Especially if WM7 stays on track to be a Q4 2010 or Q1 2011 release.

says:

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joecatskill says:

Common Verizon! I'd like the option of webOS on a similar form factor. Played w PRE in store and felt the key board a little frail. Felt like I'd break it. LOVE the WebOS. Had a 700p and used the cards on that for a bit. Then I went WinMo w Omnia. Where can I get SenseUI for that? I'd Love to win a Pre...on Verizon...

says:

I feel strongly about it and love learning more on this topic. If possible, as you gain expertise, would you mind updating your blog with more information? It is extremely helpful and beneficial to your readers. The Palm Pre can handle multiple exchange accounts. This method permit us use multiple Google Calendar, contacts and Gmail accounts. It syncs perfectly and never duplicates data or causes other issues. In general,overview in your post together all comments are helpful for me.thanks for your soon updating. I want to learn more and more about this topic.

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says:

There's a myriad of phone companies out there trying to gnaw away a share of the pie. I find motorolla and Blackberry to be reliable hardware providers.

says:

Microsoft announced and delivered another iteration of its operating system, which has found itself on a number of new devices. Their stories
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parallel each other, though many say the companies and their platforms are traveling in opposite directions.

says:

Windows Mobile users are used to wanting to exit applications. It's in our DNA. If an app's open and we don't need it? Close the sucker. Palm's made multitask effortless with its "cards" metaphor.

says:

I like webOS it is really quick.

says:

Palm's webOS is still strange to me. This is the first time I have heard about this so I am really interested in your article. Thanks for letting me know much helpful information.

says:

I love My personal Before or more precisely I love Webos, I believe which palm needs to be quick and get caught up with the addition of such functions advertisement video recording, and Gpu acess, also Flash is on the way, which will put them in front of a number of other smart phones that cannot use flash.

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