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6

WM for the POTUS? Blackberry for Commies.

 

 
That's President of the United States for those of you who don't frequent political forums ;-)
 
If you recall a few months back, Obama was un-closeted as a BlackBerry lover, fighting to keep his precious email device from those security-wielding government agents. While it doesn’t seem likely that RIM will a full-time job with the President-elect, our favorite Windows Mobile just might. But, this isn’t your normal WM phone as this guy is all tricked-out enough to make Bourne envious.
 
Take a peep at General Dynamics' Sectera Edge, which is like some retro, extra-blocky phone from years past. Running your typical WinMo software suite, it has Wifi, GSM, CDMA. It can handle secure communication channels for secure voice and email communications. Sure, it looks super-dorky and costs around….$3,300 but you do get that nice 2 year warranty. 
 
 
So why no love for RIM? Seems as if some people think RIM’s platform/hardware is not as secure as we’d like to think, including being susceptible to viruses that can do things like record phone calls. Remember how many WinMo phones can’t record those? That's why.
 
With all the flack WM has been catching lately, it’s nice to see that it is still good enough for those top level government agencies.
 

 

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Comments

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says:

I would not go so far as saying WM phones can't record phone conversations. That is all dependent on an implementation detail that is in the hands of the OEM. Since Microsoft does not enforce this particular implementation detail not all OEMs use it and thus not all WM phones can record a conversation, but some can.

True. WM is flexible like that and it can be done at the hardware level by the vendor.

But for the majority of WM devices, this cannot be done whereas with Palm Garnet devices and I'm assuming RIM, it is sort of standard.

In other words, if you went with those you'd have to figure out how to disable them on a hardware level and enforce that vs. on WM where you can easily pick up a 3rd party device where this is not physically possible.

says:

I'm just worried that this device will be exploited.
Unless somehow Microsoft manages to make their Mobile devices super secure, while their Desktop OS is not, and neither is the rest of their software.

says:

Actually, we've been phasing out our Blackberries exactly because of security concerns.

I wouldn't want to undersign an email system, where the email leaves internal control or at least oversight. Once they reach the servers in Guelph/Kitchner/Waterloo we have to trust RIM to make sure the email stays encrypted and secure.

Considering line workers get accidental invites to board meetings, I'm not so sure I can trust their security.

Additionally, there was a big effort in the last few years because RIM devices couldn't be certified in some countries without giving the government a tool to easily access emails according to regs within those countries. These countries being Saudi Arabia, Iran, China, and others of the like I am sure you can imagine the regs involved. Then I got the news recently (sometime in the last year or so) that China has certified Blackberries...

I'm more comfortable with WM because you can enforce encryption from the server, and disable the phone over air. Also monitoring means that while I may not be able to say that the system is 100% secure (anyone who can is the next fool for the foolproof system), I can say we will be able to catch intrusions quickly, and deal with them.

says:

"Once they reach the servers in Guelph/Kitchner/Waterloo we have to trust RIM to make sure the email stays encrypted and secure. "

I'm sure, like the rest of the world, there are multiple data centers.

"Considering line workers get accidental invites to board meetings, I'm not so sure I can trust their security."

Probably the sender of the invite, not the email system itself.

"These countries being Saudi Arabia, Iran, China, and others of the like I am sure you can imagine the regs involved. Then I got the news recently (sometime in the last year or so) that China has certified Blackberries..."

Basic personal email service can be jacked as there is no encryption, enterprise email (with BES) is encrypted to the teeth with device side key generation. (ie. There is NO MASTER KEY, like the one India demanded from RIM last year). Just because BlackBerry devices are sold in those countries (with BIS service), doesn't mean BES services were certified.


Last, go to google.com, type "windows mobile exploit", look at a few pages worth of results.

then try "BlackBerry exploit", look at a few pages. Notice the blackberry search returned articles for 1 (ONE) exploit. If you read about the exploit, it required the BB user to manually install a 3rd party UNSIGNED application. Which could be blocked by IT admins by adjusting the BES to disallow unsigned apps to be run on enterprise devices.

says:

"MS" and "secure" on the same sentence?

Get real.